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  • 101. Abrahamsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Loren, Anders
    Wulff, Angela
    Wängberg, Sten-Åke
    Air-sea exchange of halocarbons: the influence of diurnal and regional variations and distribution of pigments2004In: The SWEDARP 1997/98 expedition / [ed] Milliman, John D. ed; Turner, D.; Anderson, L.; et al.,, Elsevier , 2004, , p. 2789 - 2805Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 102. Abrahamsson, Katarina
    et al.
    Theorin, Mikael
    Eliasson, Charlotte
    Snoeiljs, Pauli
    Pruvost, Jacques
    The biogeochemical cycle of organo-halogens in the Arctic during polar sunrise2006In: Polarforskningssekretariatets årsbok 2005, Stockholm: Swedish Polar Research Secretariat , 2006, , p. 102-105Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 103. Abrahamsson, T.
    Sjangeli.1978In: Fjällklubbsnytt, Vol. 23, no 3, p. 10-11Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 104. Abramson, N. I.
    Lemmings of Palaearctic tundra (morphological variation, distribution patterns, taxonomy and zoogeography)1995In: Swedish-Russian Tundra Ecology-expedition-94. Tundra Ecology-94. A Cruise Report, Stockholm: Swedish Polar Research Secretariat , 1995, , p. 111-117Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 105. Abramson, Nataliya
    Morphometric variation in true lemmings (Lemmus) from the Eurasian Arctic1999In: Ambio, Vol. 28, no 3, p. 256-260Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 106. Achtert, P.
    et al.
    Brooks, I. M.
    Brooks, B. J.
    Moat, B. I.
    Prytherch, J.
    Persson, P. O. G.
    Tjernstrom, M.
    Measurement of wind profiles by motion-stabilised ship-borne Doppler lidar2015In: Atmospheric Measurement Techniques, ISSN 1867-1381, E-ISSN 1867-8548, Vol. 8, no 11, p. 4993-5007Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Three months of Doppler lidar wind measurements were obtained during the Arctic Cloud Summer Experiment on the icebreaker Oden during the summer of 2014. Such ship-borne Doppler measurements require active stabilisation to remove the effects of ship motion. We demonstrate that the combination of a commercial Doppler lidar with a custom-made motion-stabilisation platform enables the retrieval of wind profiles in the Arctic atmospheric boundary layer during both cruising and ice-breaking with statistical uncertainties comparable to land-based measurements. This held true particularly within the atmospheric boundary layer even though the overall aerosol load was very low. Motion stabilisation was successful for high wind speeds in open water and the resulting wave conditions. It allows for the retrieval of vertical winds with a random error below 0.2 ms(-1). The comparison of lidar-measured wind and radio soundings gives a mean bias of 0.3 ms(-1) (2 degrees) and a mean standard deviation of 1.1 ms(-1) (12 degrees) for wind speed (wind direction). The agreement for wind direction degrades with height. The combination of a motion-stabilised platform with a low-maintenance autonomous Doppler lidar has the potential to enable continuous long-term high-resolution ship-based wind profile measurements over the oceans.

  • 107.
    Ackermann, M.
    Inst. für Phys. Geogr..
    Frost- und Vegetationsmuster an einem Hang bei Abisko, Schwedisch Lappland.1988Student thesis
  • 108. Acland, C.M.
    et al.
    Maxce, V.C.
    Peakall, D.B.
    Fågelobservationer i Lappland.1956In: Fauna och flora, Vol. 51, no 4, p. 162-173Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 109. Acosta Hospitaleche, Carolina
    et al.
    Hagström, Jonas
    Reguero, Marcelo
    Mörs, Thomas
    Historical perspective of Otto Nordenskjöld's Antarctic penguin fossil collection and Carl Wiman's contribution2017In: Polar Record, ISSN 0032-2474, E-ISSN 1475-3057Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The early explorer and scientist Otto Nordenskjöld, leader of the Swedish South Polar Expedition of 1901–1903, was the first to collect Antarctic penguin fossils. The site is situated in the northeastern region of Seymour Island and constitutes one of the most important localities in the study of fossilised penguins. The task of describing these specimens together with fossilised whale remains was given to Professor Carl Wiman (1867–1944) at Uppsala University, Sweden. Although the paradigm for the systematic study of penguins has changed considerably over recent years, Wiman's contributions are still remarkable. His establishment of grouping by size as a basis for classification was a novel approach that allowed them to deal with an unexpectedly high morphological diversity and limited knowledge of penguin skeletal anatomy. In the past, it was useful to provide a basic framework for the group that today could be used as ‘taxon free’ categories. First, it was important to define new species, and then to establish a classification based on size and robustness. This laid the foundation for the first attempts to use morphometric parameters for the classification of isolated penguin bones. The Nordenskjöld materials constitute an invaluable collection for comparative purposes, and every year researchers from different countries visit this collection.

  • 110. Adamek, P.M.
    Geology and mineralogy of the Kopparåsen uraninite-sulphide mineralization, Norrbotten county, Sweden.1975In: Sveriges Geologiska Undersökning Serie, Vol. C 712, no 69(4), p. 3-69Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 111. Adamčík, Slavomír
    et al.
    Slovák, Marek
    Eberhardt, Ursula
    Ronikier, Anna
    Jairus, Teele
    Hampe, Felix
    Verbeken, Annemieke
    Molecular inference, multivariate morphometrics and ecological assessment are applied in concert to delimit species in the Russula clavipes complex2016In: Mycologia, ISSN 0027-5514, E-ISSN 1557-2536, Vol. 108, no 4, p. 716-730Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Species of Russula subsect. Xerampelinae are notoriously difficult to identify and name and have not been subject to molecular study. A group of species, referred to here as the R. clavipes complex, growing in association with Salix, Betula and Populus as well as coniferous tree species from temperate to arctic and alpine habitats, were examined. Analyses of the nuc rDNA internal transcribed spacer (ITS) region and a numerical analysis of morphological characters were used. The R. clavipes complex is a monophyletic group within Russula subsect. Xerampelinae, according to molecular results. The complex includes three species: R. nuoljae is a phylogenetically and morphologically well-supported species while the other two, R. clavipes and R. pascua, are similar based on ITS data and morphology but separate based on their ecology. Russula pseudoolivascens is conspecific with R. clavipes. Several combinations of characters traditionally used in the taxonomy of R. subsect. Xerampelinae are inappropriate for species delimitation in this group and the adequacy of the ITS for species identification in this group is discussed. Detailed microscopic observations on the type collection of R. nuoljae are presented and illustrated, along with a key to the European members of R. subsect. Xerampelinae.

  • 112. Adedokun, J.A.
    et al.
    Holmgren, B.
    Acoustic sounder detection of anabatic/katabatic winds in Abisko N. Sweden.1991In: Renewable Energy, Vol. 1, no 1, p. 77-89Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 113. Adedokun, J.A.
    et al.
    Holmgren, B.
    Acoustic sounder doppler measurement of the wind fields associated with a mountain stratus transformed into a valley fog: a case study.1993In: Atmospheric Environment, Vol. 27A, no 7, p. 1091-1098Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 114. Adeyefa, Z.D.
    Spectral Investigations of Solar Irradiance under Arctic and Tropical Weather Situations.1996Student thesis
  • 115. Adeyefa, Z.D.
    et al.
    Holmgren, B.
    Adedokun, J.A.
    Spectral solar radiation measurements and turbidity: comparative studies within a tropical and a subarctic environment.1997In: Solar Energy, Vol. 60, no 1, p. 17-24Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 116. Adler, Ruth E.
    et al.
    Polyak, Leonid
    Ortiz, Joseph D.
    Kaufman, Darrell S.
    Channell, James E.T.
    Chuang Xuan,
    Grottoli, Andréa G.
    Sellén, Emma
    Crawford, Kevin A.
    Sediment record from the western Arctic Ocean with an improved Late Quaternary age resolution: HOTRAX core HLY0503-8JPC, Mendeleev Ridge2009In: Global and Planetary Change, ISSN 0921-8181, E-ISSN 1872-6364, Vol. 68, no 1-2, p. 18-29Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Sediment core HLY0503-8JPC raised by the HOTRAX'05 expedition from the Mendeleev Ridge was analyzed for multiple lithological, paleontological, and stable-isotopic proxies to reconstruct paleoceanographic conditions in the western Arctic Ocean during the Late Quaternary. The core, extensively sampled in the upper 5 m, reveals pronounced changes in sedimentary environments during the ca. 250 kyr interval encompassing Marine Isotopic Stages (MIS) 1 to 7. An estimated average resolution of 500 yr/sample, at least for the last glacial cycle including the last interglacial, provides more detail than seen in other sedimentary records from the western Arctic Ocean. The age control is provided by 14C and amino acid racemization measurements on planktonic foraminifers and correlations with the stratigraphy developed for the central Lomonosov Ridge and with glacial events at the Eurasian Arctic margin. Cyclic variations in lithology combined with foraminiferal abundance and stable-isotopic composition indicate profound changes in hydrographic and depositional environments between interglacial-type and glacial-type periods apparently reflecting a combination of 100-kyr and precessional time scales. This periodicity is complicated by abrupt iceberg- and/or meltwater-discharge events with variable (Laurentide vs. Eurasian) provenance. The proxy record from the interval identified as the last interglacial (MIS 5e), which may aid in understanding the future state of the Arctic Ocean, indicates low ice conditions and possibly enhanced stratification of the water column.

  • 117. Adrielsson, L
    et al.
    Alexanderson, H
    Interactions between the Greenland Ice Sheet and the Liverpool Land coastal ice cap during the last two glaciation cycles2005In: Journal of Quaternary Science, ISSN 0267-8179, E-ISSN 1099-1417, Vol. 20, no 3, p. 269-283Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The sedimentary record from the Ugleelv Valley on central Jameson Land, East Greenland, adds new information about terrestrial palaeoenvironments and glaciations to the glacial history of the Scoresby Sund fjord area. A western extension of a coastal ice cap on Liverpool Land reached eastern Jameson Land during the early Scoresby Sund glaciation (approximate to the Saalian). During the following glacial maximum the Greenland Ice Sheet inundated the Jameson Land plateau from the west. The Weichselian also starts with an early phase of glacial advance from the Liverpool Land ice cap, while polar desert and ice-free conditions characterised the subsequent part of the Weichselian on the Jameson Land plateau. The two glaciation cycles show a repeated pattern of interaction between the Greenland Ice Sheet in the west and an ice cap on Liverpool Land in the east. Each cycle starts with extensive glacier growth in the coastal mountains followed by a decline of the coastal glaciation, a change to cold and arid climate and a late stage of maximum extent of the Greenland Ice Sheet. Copyright (c) 2005 John Wiley T Sons, Ltd.

  • 118. Adrielsson, Lena
    et al.
    Alexanderson, Helena
    Two cycles of ice-sheet and coastal mountain glaciation in central East Greenland2002In: BoreasArticle in journal (Refereed)
  • 119. Adrielsson, Lena
    et al.
    Alexandersson, Helena
    Late Quaternary glaciation history of Jameson Land, East Greenland2001In: I: Polarforskningssekretariatets årsbok 2000 / [ed] Eva, Grönlund, Stockholm: Swedish Polar Research Secretariat , 2001, , p. 58 - 61Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 120.
    Aebi, M.A.
    Department of Geography. Institute of Meteorology, Climatology and Remote Sensing..
    Analysis of Critical Meteorological Conditions Essential to Snowmelt Induced Slush-Torrent Release over the Last 50 Years in the Abisko Mountains, Northern Swedish Lapland.2001Student thesis
  • 121. Aerts, R
    The freezer defrosting: global warming and litter decomposition rates in cold biomes2006In: Journal of Ecology, ISSN 0022-0477, E-ISSN 1365-2745, Vol. 94, no 4, p. 713-724Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    1 Decomposition of plant litter, a key component of the global carbon budget, is hierarchically controlled by the triad: climate > litter quality > soil organisms. Given the sensitivity of decomposition to temperature, especially in cold biomes, it has been hypothesized that global warming will lead to increased litter decomposition rates, both through direct temperature effects and through indirect effects on litter quality and soil organisms. 2 A meta-analysis of experimental warming studies in cold biomes (34 site-species combinations) showed that warming resulted in slightly increased decomposition rates. However, this response was strongly dependent on the method used: open top chambers reduced decomposition rates, whereas heating lamps stimulated decomposition rates. The low responsiveness was mainly due to moisture-limited decomposition rates in the warming treatments, especially at mesic and xeric sites. This control of litter decomposition by both temperature and moisture was corroborated by natural gradient studies. 3 Interspecific differences in litter quality and decomposability are substantially larger than warming-induced phenotypic responses. Thus, the changes in the species composition and structure of plant communities that have been observed in medium-term warming studies in cold biomes will have a considerably greater impact on ecosystem litter decomposition than phenotypic responses. 4 Soil fauna communities in cold biomes are responsive to climate warming. Moreover, temperature-driven migration of the, hitherto absent, large comminuters to high-latitude sites may significantly increase decomposition rates. However, we do not know how far-reaching the consequences of changes in the species composition and structure of the soil community are for litter decomposition, as there is a lack of data on functional species redundancy and the species’ dispersal ability. 5 Global warming will lead to increased litter decomposition rates only if there is sufficient soil moisture. Hence, climate scenario and experimental studies should focus more on both factors and their interaction. As interspecific differences in potential decomposability and litter chemistry are substantially larger than phenotypic responses to warming, the focus of future research should be on the former. In addition, more light should be shed on the below-ground ‘darkness’ to evaluate the ecological significance of warming-induced soil fauna community changes for litter decomposition processes in cold biomes.

  • 122. Aerts, R
    et al.
    Cornelissen, J H C
    Dorrepaal, E
    van Logtestijn, R S P
    Callaghan, T V
    Effects of experimentally imposed climate scenarios on flowering phenology and flower production of subarctic bog species2004In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 10, no 9, p. 1599-1609Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate scenarios for high-latitude areas predict not only increased summer temperatures, but also larger variation in snowfall and winter temperatures. By using open-top chambers, we experimentally manipulated both summer temperatures and winter and spring snow accumulations and temperatures independently in a blanket bog in subarctic Sweden, yielding six climate scenarios. We studied the effects of these scenarios on flowering phenology and flower production of Andromeda polifolia (woody evergreen) and Rubus chamaemorus (perennial herb) during 2 years. The second year of our study (2002) was characterized by unusually high spring and early summer temperatures. Our winter manipulations led to consistent increases in winter snow cover. As a result, average and minimum air and soil temperatures in the high snow cover treatments were higher than in the winter ambient treatments, whereas temperature fluctuations were smaller. Spring warming resulted in higher average, minimum, and maximum soil temperatures. Summer warming led to higher air and soil temperatures in mid-summer (June-July), but not in late summer (August-September). The unusually high temperatures in 2002 advanced the median flowering date by 2 weeks for both species in all treatments. Superimposed on this effect, we found that for both Andromeda and Rubus, all our climate treatments (except summer warming for Rubus) advanced flowering by 1-4 days. The total flower production of both species showed a more or less similar response: flower production in the warm year 2002 exceeded that in 2001 by far. However, in both species flower production was only stimulated by the spring-warming treatments. Our results show that the reproductive ecology of both species is very responsive to climate change but this response is very dependent on specific climate events, especially those that occur in winter and spring. This suggests that high-latitude climate change experiments should focus more on winter and spring events than has been the case so far.

  • 123. Aerts, R.
    et al.
    Cornelissen, J. H. C.
    van Logtestijn, R. S. P.
    Callaghan, T. V.
    Climate change has only a minor impact on nutrient resorption parameters in a high-latitude peatland2007In: Oecologia, ISSN 0029-8549, E-ISSN 1432-1939, Vol. 151, no 1, p. 132-139Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Nutrient resorption from senescing plant tissues is an important determinant of the fitness of plant populations in nutrient-poor ecosystems, because it makes plants less dependent on current nutrient uptake. Moreover, it can have significant “afterlife” effects through its impact on litter chemistry and litter decomposability. Little is known about the effects of climate change on nutrient resorption. We studied the effects of climate change treatments (including winter snow addition, and spring and/or summer warming) on nutrient resorption of four dominant species in a nutrient-poor subarctic peatland. These species were Betula nana (woody deciduous), Vaccinium uliginosum (woody deciduous), Calamagrostis lapponica (graminoid) and Rubus chamaemorus (forb). After five years of treatments both mature and senesced leaf N concentrations showed a small but significant overall reduction in response to the climate treatments. However, the effects were species-specific. For example, in the controls the N concentration in senesced leaves of Calamagrostis (3.0 +/- 0.2 mg N g(-1)) was about four times lower than for Rubus (11.2 +/- 0.2 mg N g(-1)). There were no significant treatment effects on N resorption efficiency (% of the N pool in mature leaves that is resorbed during senescence). The nitrogen resorption efficiency of Calamagrostis (about 80%) was higher than in the other three species (about 60%). Thus, climate change has only a minor impact on nutrient resorption parameters. However, given the substantial interspecific differences in these parameters, substantial changes in plant-soil feedbacks may be expected as a result of the observed changes in the species composition of high-latitude vegetation. These changes are species-specific and thus difficult to predict.

  • 124. Aerts, R.
    et al.
    Wallén, B.
    Malmer, N.
    Growth-limiting nutrients in Sphagnum-dominated bogs subject to low and high atmospheric nitrogen supply.1992In: Journal of Ecology, Vol. 80, no 1, p. 131-140Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 125. Aerts, R.
    et al.
    Wallén, B.
    Malmer, N.
    Caluwe, H.de.
    Nutritional constraints on Sphagnum-growth and potential decay in northern peatlands.2001In: Journal of Ecology, Vol. 89, no 2, p. 292-299Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 126. AERTS, RIEN
    Nitrogen-dependent recovery of subarctic tundra vegetation after simulation of extreme winter warming damage to Empetrum hermaphroditum2010In: Global Change Biology, Vol. 16, no 3, p. 1071-1081Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Abstract Vast areas of (sub)arctic tundra are dominated by the ericoid dwarf shrub Empetrum hermaphroditum. Recent experimental and observational data have shown that Empetrum can be damaged heavily by recurrent extreme winter warming. In addition, summer warming leads to increased soil N availability in tundra ecosystems. In a 7-year experiment, I investigated the recovery of subarctic Empetrum-dominated tundra vegetation using a factorial combination of various degrees of aboveground Empetrum removal (simulating the damaging effects of extreme winter warming) and N addition (simulating one of the effects of summer warming). After 7 years no new species had established in the plots. The growth of planted Betula nana seedlings was stimulated by Empetrum removal and reduced by N addition. This Empetrum-dominated tundra ecosystem was resilient against severe disturbances. Only when Empetrum was 100% removed did it fail to recover, and only in combination with high N supply the subordinate species (notably Eriophorum vaginatum and Rubus chamaemorus, a graminoid and a forb) could benefit. In the 50% removal treatment Empetrum recovered in 7 years when no N was supplied and the cover of the subordinate species did not change. However, when N was added Empetrum recovered faster (in 4 years) and the subordinates decreased. When Empetrum was not removed and N was added, Empetrum even increased in abundance at the expense of the subordinate species. Thus, profound changes in tundra ecosystems can only be expected when Empetrum is very heavily damaged as a result of recurrent extreme winter warming and when soil N availability is increased as a result of summer warming. These changes in species composition upon extreme disturbance events may lead to a wide variety of ecosystem feedbacks and cascade processes as this tundra system is relatively species-poor, and can be hypothesized to have low functional redundancy.

  • 127. Aerts, Rien
    et al.
    Callaghan, Terry V.
    Dorrepaal, Ellen
    Van Logtestijn, Richard S. P.
    Cornelissen, Johannes H. C.
    Seasonal climate manipulations result in species-specific changes in leaf nutrient levels and isotopic composition in a sub-arctic bog2009In: Functional Ecology, Vol. 23, no 4, p. 680-688Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change in cold biomes not only involves higher summer temperatures, but also warmer springs and more winter precipitation. So far, little is known about species responses to these seasonal components of climate change.

     We experimentally manipulated spring and summer temperatures and winter snow accumulation and temperatures independently in a peatland in sub‐arctic Sweden. This yielded six climate scenarios and we studied the responses of the peat moss Sphagnum fuscum, the evergreen dwarf shrubs Empetrum hermaphroditum and Andromeda polifolia, the deciduous dwarf shrubs Betula nana and Vaccinium uliginosum, the grass Calamagrostis lapponica and the forb Rubus chamaemorus.                  

    We found substantial interspecific differences in leaf nutrient and carbon exchange variables that reflect the response of tundra plants to climate change. S. fuscum had the lowest N and P concentrations, with increasing N and P concentrations (and decreasing C/N and C/P ratios) going from evergreen dwarf shrubs, to the grass, deciduous dwarf shrubs and the forb. Leaf N/P ratios varied between 10 and 14 which points to N‐limited plant growth.                  

    The natural abundance of 15N varied very strongly among species and growth forms. These differences corresponded with the presence and type of mycorrhizal association in the plant roots. Leaf carbon isotope discrimination also differed strongly among species and growth forms, but the absolute differences were relatively small (< 5‰). The rank order was: forb and graminoid < moss and evergreen shrubs < deciduous shrubs.                  

    After 4 years, the effects of realistic climate change manipulations on leaf nutrient and carbon exchange variables were idiosyncratic with respect to species and generally small compared to the differences among species and growth forms. At the phenotypic level, spring warming or winter snow addition effects occurred as frequently as summer warming effects.

    This implies that the changes in the species composition and structure of plant communities that have been observed in medium‐term warming studies in cold biomes will have much more impact on plant‐mediated nutrient and carbon cycling pathways and rates than climate‐change induced phenotypic responses, irrespective of the seasonal timing of these climate changes.

  • 128. Afzelius, K.
    Apomixis in der Gattung Arnica.1936In: Svensk Botanisk Tidskrift, Vol. 30, p. 572-579Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 129. Agrell, I.
    An objective method for characterization of animal and plant communities1945In: Kungliga Fysiografiska Sällskapets Förhandlingar, p. 1-15Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 130. Agrell, I.
    Ein Artproblem in der Collembolengattung Folsomia1939In: Kungliga Fysiografiska Sällskapets Förhandlingar, Vol. 9, no 13, p. 14-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 131. Agrell, I.
    Ein Vergleich zwischen Isotoma bipunctata Axelson und pallida-Formen von Isotoma notabilis Schäfer1939In: Kungliga Fysiografiska Sällskapets Förhandlingar, Vol. 9, no 14, p. 4-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 132. Agrell, I.
    Kritisches Verzeichnis der schwedischen Collembolen mit einigen Neubeschreibungen und tiergeographischen Erörterungen1943In: Opuscula Entomologica, Vol. 8, p. 123-137Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 133. Agrell, I.
    The collemboles in nests of warm-blooded animals with a method for sociological analysis1945In: Kungliga Fysiografiska Sällskapets Handlingar, NF, Vol. 56, no 10, p. 1-19Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 134. Agrell, I.
    Zur Kenntnis der schwedischen Collembolen mit Beschreibung von vier neuen Arten und einigen Varietäten1939In: Opuscula Entomologica, Vol. 4, no 3-4, p. 159-168Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 135. Agrell, I.
    Zur Ökologie der Collembolen. Untersuchungen im schwedischen Lappland1941In: Opuscula Entomologica Suppl., Vol. 3, p. 236-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 136. Agrell, Jep
    Food-plant preferences in the Arctic: a report from the lemming cafeteria2006In: Polarforskningssekretariatets årsbok 2005, Stockholm: Swedish Polar Research Secretariat , 2006, , p. 57 - 59Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 137. Ahlberg, P.
    Early Cambrian trilobites from mount Luopakte northern Sweden.1979In: Sveriges Geologiska Undersökning Serie, Vol. C 765, no 73(6), p. 3-12Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 138. Ahlberg, P.
    Early Cambrian trilobites from northern Scandinavia.1980In: Norsk Geologisk Tidskrift, Vol. 60, p. 153-159Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 139. Ahlberg, P.
    Lower Cambrian trilobites and biostratigraphy of Scandinavia.1984Student thesis
  • 140. Ahlberg, P.
    et al.
    Bergström, J.
    Lower Cambrian ptychopariid trilobites from Scandinavia.1978In: Sveriges Geologiska Undersökning Serie, Vol. Ca 49, p. 40-Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 141. Ahlberg, P.
    et al.
    Taylor, M.E
    Ptychopariid trilobites in the Lower Cambrian of Scandinavia.1981Conference paper (Other academic)
  • 142. Ahlbom, B.
    Fågellivet i Vadvetjåkka nationalpark.1971In: Fauna och flora, Vol. 66, no 6, p. 241-248Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 143. Ahlmann, H. W:son
    Excursion 1 a, to the north of Sweden (Stockholm-Boliden-Porjus-Sjöfallet-Kiruna-Abisko-Riksgränsen).1930Report (Other academic)
  • 144. Ahlmann, H. W:son
    Excursion vers le nord de la Suède.1930Report (Other academic)
  • 145. Ahlmann, H. W:son
    Glacier variations and climatic fluctuations.1953Report (Other academic)
  • 146. Ahlmann, H. W:son
    Guide pour les excursions 1 a, au départ de Skellefteå.1930Report (Other academic)
  • 147. Ahlmann, H. W:son
    Le niveau de glaciation comme fonction de l'accumulation d'humidité sous forme solide.1924In: Geografiska Annaler, Vol. 6, no 3-4, p. 223-272Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 148. Ahlmann, H. W:son
    Le régime des glaciers. Ses éléments, ses variations.1941In: Revue de Géeographie Alpine, Vol. 29, p. 537-556Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 149. Ahlmann, H. W:son
    Projet d'un programme de recherches glaciaires.1929In: Geografiska Annaler, Vol. 11, no (3-4), p. 313-320Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 150. Ahlmann, H. W:son
    Recent Glaciological Investigations in Sweden. - Union Geodésique et Géeophysique Internationale. Association Internationale d'Hydrologie Scientifique.1948In: Résumés des Rapports Scientifique, Vol. 1948, p. 119-122Article in journal (Other academic)
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