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  • 1. BUONO, Monica
    et al.
    FERNANDEZ, Martha
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    MARENSSI, Sergio
    SANTILLANA, Sergio
    Mörs, Thomas
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Enheten för paleobiologi.
    Eocene basilosaurid whales from the La Meseta Formation, Marambio (Seymour) Island, Antarctica2016In: Ameghiniana, ISSN 0002-7014, E-ISSN 1851-8044, Vol. 53, no 3, p. 296-315Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Basal fully aquatic whales, the basilosaurids are worldwide known from Bartonian–Priabonian localities, indicating that this group was widely distributed during the late middle Eocene. In the Northern Hemisphere, fossils of basilosaurids are abundant, while records in the Southern Hemisphere are scarce and, in some cases (i.e., Antarctica), doubtful. The presence of basilosaurids in Antarctica was, until now, uncertain because most of the records are based on fragmentary materials that preclude an accurate assignment to known archaeocete taxa. Here we report the findings of mandibles, teeth, and innominate bone remains of basilosaurids recovered from the La Meseta Formation (TELM 4 Lutetian–Bartonian and; TELM 7 Priabonian), in Marambio (Seymour) Island (James Ross Basin, Antarctic Peninsula). These findings confirm the presence of Basilosauridae in the marine realm of Antarctica, increasing our knowledge of the paleobiogeographic distribution of basilosaurids during the middle–late Eocene. In addition, one of these records is among the oldest occurrences of basilosaurids worldwide, indicating a rapid radiation and dispersal of this group since at least the early middle Eocene.

  • 2. Engelbrecht, Andrea
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Enheten för paleobiologi.
    Reguero,, Marcelo
    Kriwet, Jürgen
    A new sawshark, Pristiophorus laevis, from the Eocene of Antarctica with comments on Pristiophorus lanceolatus2016In: Historical Biology, ISSN 0891-2963, E-ISSN 1029-2381Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The highly fossiliferous Eocene deposits of the Antarctic Peninsula are among the most productive sites for fossil remains in the Southern Hemisphere and offer rare insights into high-latitude faunas during the Palaeogene. Chondrichthyans, which are represented by abundant isolated remains, seemingly dominate the marine assemblages. Eocene Antarctic sawsharks have only been known from few isolated rostral spines up to now, that were assigned to Pristiophorus lanceolatus. Here, we present the first oral teeth of a sawshark from the Eocene of Seymour Island and a re-evaluation of previously described Pristiophorus remains from Gondwana consisting exclusively of rostral spines. The holotype of Pristiophorus lanceolatus represents a single, abraded and insufficiently illustrated spine from the Oligocene of New Zealand. All other Cenozoic rostral spines assigned to this species are morphologically very indistinct and closely resemble those of living taxa. Consequently, we regard this species as dubious and introduce a new species, Pristiophorus laevis, based on oral teeth. The combination of dental characteristics of the new species makes it unique compared to all other described species based on oral teeth. Rostral spines from the Eocene of Seymour Island are assigned to this new species whereas those from other Cenozoic Gondwana localities remain ambiguous.

  • 3. ENGELBRECHT, Andrea
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Enheten för paleobiologi.
    REGUERO, Marcelo
    KRIWET, Jürgen
    Revision of Eocene Antarctic carpet sharks (Elasmobranchii, Orectolobiformes) from Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula2016In: Journal of Systematic Palaeontology, ISSN 1477-2019, E-ISSN 1478-0941Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 4. Jadwiszczak, Piotr
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Enheten för paleobiologi.
    Aspects of diversity in early Antarctic penguins2011In: Acta Palaeontologica Polonica, ISSN 0567-7920, E-ISSN 1732-2421Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 5. JADWISZCZAK, Piotr
    et al.
    Mörs, Thomas
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Enheten för paleobiologi.
    First report on quill pits in early penguins2016In: Antarctic Science, ISSN 0954-1020, E-ISSN 1365-2079Article in journal (Refereed)
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