Change search
Refine search result
1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Marthinsen, Gunnhild
    et al.
    Wennerberg, Liv
    Lifjeld, Jan T.
    Phylogeography and subspecies taxonomy of dunlins (Calidris alpina) in western Palearctic analysed by DNA microsatellites and amplified fragment length polymorphism markers2007In: Biological Journal of the Linnean Society, ISSN 0024-4066, E-ISSN 1095-8312, Vol. 92, no 4, p. 713-726Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    In a circumpolar wader, the dunlin (Calidris alpina), there are 11 named subspecies, but only five mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) lineages have been found. In the present study, we investigated the genetic structure of dunlins in western Palearctic (from East Greenland to Taimyr peninsula) using DNA microsatellites and amplified fragment length polymorphism (AFLP) markers that may detect more recent differentiation than mtDNA. In this region, we consider four described subspecies; alpina, schinzii, arctica and centralis, together comprising two mtDNA lineages. We analyse seven polymorphic microsatellite loci and 91 AFLP markers in 287 and 152 unrelated individuals, respectively, originating from 17 populations. Neither microsatellites nor AFLPs reveal distinct groups that correspond to currently recognized subspecies. There is a clear pattern of isolation by distance in microsatellites. Our results do not contradict the former mtDNA results that there are two phylogenetic lineages (approximately corresponding to schinzii and centralis) that have met and formed a cline (alpina). We find no difference between schinzii and arctica (East Greenland). We conclude that, given the lack of distinct groups and the gradual changes in microsatellite allele frequencies, these markers provide little genetic support for the dunlin subspecies taxonomy in the western Palearctic. (c) 2007 The Linnean Society of London.

  • 2.
    Marthinsen, Gunnhild
    et al.
    Univ Oslo, Nat Hist Museum, Natl Ctr Biosystemat, N-0318 Oslo, Norway..
    Wennerberg, Liv
    Univ Oslo, Nat Hist Museum, Natl Ctr Biosystemat, N-0318 Oslo, Norway.;Buskerud fylkeskommune, N-3020 Fylkeshuset, Drammen, Norway..
    Pierce, Elin P.
    Univ Oslo, Nat Hist Museum, Natl Ctr Biosystemat, N-0318 Oslo, Norway.;Montana State Univ, Dept Ecol, Bozeman, MT 59717 USA..
    Lifjeld, Jan T.
    Univ Oslo, Nat Hist Museum, Natl Ctr Biosystemat, N-0318 Oslo, Norway..
    Phylogeographic origin and genetic diversity of dunlin Calidris alpina in Svalbard2008In: Polar Biology, ISSN 0722-4060, E-ISSN 1432-2056, Vol. 31, no 11, p. 1409-1420Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We investigated the genetic structure of the presumably small (10-100 pairs) and isolated dunlin (Calidris alpina) population breeding in Svalbard, and compared it with similar data recently published from several dunlin populations in the western Palearctic and East Greenland. Using mitochondrial and nuclear DNA markers, as well as data on bill lengths, we sought to infer the phylogeographic origin of Svalbard dunlins and assess their within-population level of genetic diversity. Only dunlins with haplotypes of the European mtDNA clade (EUR) were found in Svalbard, indicating a close resemblance to dunlin populations in East Greenland and Iceland. Microsatellite data for Svalbard dunlins, as well as their short bills, also supported a western origin. The Svalbard population did not show signs of inbreeding or reduced levels of genetic diversity compared to other investigated populations, which suggests that the population was recently founded or is currently subject to considerable gene flow.

  • 3.
    Marthinsen, Gunnhild
    et al.
    Univ Oslo, Nat Hist Museum, Natl Ctr Biosystemat, N-0318 Oslo, Norway..
    Wennerberg, Liv
    Univ Oslo, Nat Hist Museum, Natl Ctr Biosystemat, N-0318 Oslo, Norway..
    Solheim, Roar
    Agder Museum Nat Hist, N-4686 Gimlemoen, Kristiansand S, Norway..
    Lifjeld, Jan T.
    Univ Oslo, Nat Hist Museum, Natl Ctr Biosystemat, N-0318 Oslo, Norway..
    No phylogeographic structure in the circumpolar snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus)2009In: Conservation Genetics, ISSN 1566-0621, E-ISSN 1572-9737, Vol. 10, no 4, p. 923-933Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The snowy owl (Bubo scandiacus) is a nomadic species with a circumpolar distribution. It has recently declined in the western Palearctic and may thus be worthy of special consideration for conservation. We investigated genetic structure in three well separated geographic regions within the snowy owls' breeding range. We sequenced two mitochondrial genes; the control region and cytochrome b, and two Z-chromosome introns; VLDLR-9 and BRM-15. We found no phylogeographic structure among the sampled regions, indicating high levels of gene flow in the recent past and possibly still today. Intra-population diversity did not vary between regions for the control region, but for Cyt b, North American birds had higher haplotype diversity than Scandinavian and eastern Siberian birds. Western Palearctic birds do not seem to be genetically deprived or inbred. Genetic diversity in the snowy owl was not lower than Scandinavian populations of three other owl species: tawny owls (Strix aluco), Tengmalm's owls (Aegolius funereus) and eagle owls (Bubo bubo).

  • 4.
    Wennerberg, Liv
    et al.
    Buskerud fylkeskommune, N-3020 Fylkeshuset, Drammen, Norway..
    Marthinsen, Gunnhild
    Univ Oslo, Natl Ctr Biosystemat, Nat Hist Museum, N-0318 Oslo, Norway..
    Lifjeld, Jan T.
    Univ Oslo, Natl Ctr Biosystemat, Nat Hist Museum, N-0318 Oslo, Norway..
    Conservation genetics and phylogeography of southern dunlins Calidris alpina schinzii2008In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048X, Vol. 39, no 4, p. 423-437Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Breeding populations of southern dunlin Calidris alpina schinzii in South Fennoscandia and the Baltic are severely fragmented and declining dramatically. Information on the genetic structure and diversity is therefore of importance for the conservation and management of these populations. Here we present the results of comparative genetic analyses of these populations with other populations of the schinzii, alpina and arctica subspecies in northern Europe. We sequenced the mitochondrial DNA control region and the Z-chromosome intron VLDLR-9, and analyzed microsatellites and AFLPs, for analyses of within-population genetic diversity. We also extended previous analyses of the phylogeographic structure of dunlins in northern Europe with a larger sample of individuals and populations. Our results revealed no evidence of reduced genetic diversity or increased levels of inbreeding in the small and fragmented populations around the Baltic Sea as compared to the more vital and larger populations elsewhere. Nevertheless, their small population sizes and presumably high degree of isolation may lead to local extinctions, indicating that demographic and ecological factors may pose a greater threat to the survival of these populations than purely genetic factors. Phylogeographically, the schinzii populations in Scandinavia and the Baltic do not form a separate genetic clade, but are part of larger cline of genetic variation encompassing several recognized subspecies of dunlins in the western Palearctic region. Only the Icelandic population showed some distinctiveness in genetic structure and might therefore be considered a separate management unit. Our study highlights the general problem of lack of genetic support for subspecies in avian taxonomy and conservation genetics.

1 - 4 of 4
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf