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  • 1. Gee, David
    et al.
    Bogolepova, Olga
    Lorenz, Henning
    The Timanide, Caledonide and Uralide orogens in the Eurasian high Arctic, and relationships to the paleocontinents Laurentia, Baltica and Siberia2006In: European Lithosphere Dynamics, 2006, p. 507-520Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Lorenz, Henning
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Earth Sci, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Gee, David G.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Earth Sci, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Larionov, Alexander N.
    Ctr Isotop Res, AP Karpinsky Russian Geol Res Inst VSEGEI, St Petersburg 199106, Russia..
    Majka, Jaroslaw
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Earth Sci, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    The Grenville-Sveconorwegian orogen in the high Arctic2012In: Geological Magazine, ISSN 0016-7568, E-ISSN 1469-5081, Vol. 149, no 5, p. 875-891Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Throughout the high Arctic, from northern Canada (Pearya) to eastern Greenland, Svalbard, Franz Josef Land, Novaya Zemlya, Taimyr and Severnaya Zemlya and, at lower Arctic latitudes, in the Urals and the Scandinavian Caledonides, there is evidence of the Grenville-Sveconorwegian Orogen. The latest orogenic phase (c. 950 Ma) is well exposed in the Arctic, but only minor Mesoproterozoic fragments of this orogen occur on land. However, detrital zircons in Neoproterozoic and Palaeozoic successions provide unambiguous Mesoproterozoic to earliest Neoproterozoic (c. 950 Ma) signatures. This evidence strongly suggests that the Grenville-Sveconorwegian Orogen continues northwards from type areas in southeastern Canada and southwestern Scandinavia, via the North Atlantic margins to the high Arctic continental shelves. The widespread distribution of late Mesoproterozoic detrital zircons far to the north of the Grenville-Sveconorwegian type areas is usually explained in terms of long-distance transport (thousands of kilometres) of either sediments by river systems from source to sink, or of slices of lithosphere (terranes) moved on major transcurrent faults. Both of these interpretations involve much greater complexity than the hypothesis favoured here, the former involving recycling of the zircons from the strata of initial deposition into those of their final residence and the latter requiring a diversity of microcontinents. Neither explains either the fragmentary evidence for the presence of Grenville-Sveconorwegian terranes in the high Arctic, or the composition of the basement of the continental shelves. The presence of the Grenville-Sveconorwegian Orogen in the Arctic, mainly within the hinterland and margins of the Caledonides and Timanides, has profound implications not only for the reconstructions of the Rodinia supercontinent in early Neoproterozoic time, but also the origin of these Neoproterozoic and Palaeozoic mountain belts.

  • 3.
    Lorenz, Henning
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Earth Sci, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Gee, David G.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Earth Sci, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Simonetti, Antonio
    Univ Alberta, Dept Earth & Atmospher Sci, Edmonton, AB T6G 2M7, Canada..
    Detrital zircon ages and provenance of the Late Neoproterozoic and Palaeozoic successions on Severnaya Zemlya, Kara Shelf: a tie to Baltica2008In: Norsk Geologisk Tidsskrift, ISSN 0029-196X, E-ISSN 1502-5322, Vol. 88, no 4, p. 235-258Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Neoproterozoic to Devonian sedimentary successions of Severnaya Zemlya, in the Russian high Arctic, have been sampled for detrital zircon provenance studies. 50-100 zircons were analyzed from 11 samples and, of these, about 60% (c. 500 totally) were used for the geological interpretation. Most of the samples show a similar Precambrian age spectrum, including a strong, prominent peak in the Late Vendian to Early Cambrian and well defined Mesoproterozoic populations reaching back into the Late Palaeoproterozoic. Only a few older zircons are present, composing minor populations at c. 2.7 Ga. The younger samples (Ordovician and Devonian) also contain an Early-Mid Ordovician population, probably related to local igneous activity. The detrital zircon age spectrum of Severnaya Zemlya constitutes a strong link to the Timanian margin of northwestern Russia, providing support for the interpretation that this part of the high Arctic was a northern continuation of Baltica's eastern passive margin in the Early Palaeozoic. It may also have had close connections not only with the Northern Belt of the Tajmyr Orogen, but also to the Central Belt, which was accreted to Siberia in the Vendian.

  • 4.
    Lorenz, Henning
    et al.
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Earth Sci, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Männik, Peep
    Tallinn Univ Technol, Inst Geol, EE-19086 Tallinn, Estonia..
    Gee, David
    Uppsala Univ, Dept Earth Sci, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Proskurnin, Vasilij
    VSEGEI, St Petersburg 199106, Russia..
    Geology of the Severnaya Zemlya Archipelago and the North Kara Terrane in the Russian high Arctic2008In: International journal of earth sciences, ISSN 1437-3254, E-ISSN 1437-3262, Vol. 97, no 3, p. 519-547Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Severnaya Zemlya Archipelago is located at 80 degrees N near the continental shelf break, between the Kara and Laptev seas. Sedimentary successions of Neoproterozoic and Palaeozoic age dominate the bedrock geology. Together with Northern Tajmyr, Severnaya Zemlya constitutes the main land areas of the North Kara Terrane (NKT), which is inferred here to have been a part of the Timanide margin of Baltica, i.e. an integral part of Baltica at least since the Vendian. Vendian turbidites derived from the Timanide Orogen are inferred to have been deposited on Neoproterozoic greenschist facies, granite-intruded basement. Shallow-water siliclastic deposition in the Early to Mid-Cambrian was followed by highly organic-rich shales in the Late Cambrian and influx of more turbidites. An episode of folding, the Kan'on River deformation, separates these formations from the overlying Tremadocian conglomerates and sandstones. In the Early Ordovician, rift-related magmatic rocks accompanied the deposition of variegated marls, sandstones, carbonates and evaporites. Dark shales and gypsiferous limestones characterise the Mid-Ordovician. Late Ordovician quartz-sandstones mark a hiatus, followed by carbonate rocks that extend up into and through most of the Silurian. The latter give way upwards into Old Red Sandstones, which are inferred to have been deposited in a Caledonian foreland basin. Deformation, reaching the area in the latest Devonian or earliest Carboniferous and referred to as the Severnaya Zemlya episode, is thought to be Caledonian-related. The dominating E-vergent structure was controlled by decollement zones in Ordovician evaporite-bearing strata; detachment folds and thrusts developed in the west and were apparently impeded by a barrier of Ordovician igneous rocks in the east. Below the decollement zones, the Neoproterozoic to Early Ordovician succession was deformed into open to close folds. The exposed strata in the lower structural level have been juxtaposed with those in the upper structural level along the major N-trending Fiordovoe Lake Fault Zone, which involved several kilometres of dextral strike-slip movement and downthrow to the west. A major Early Carboniferous unconformity separates the folded Mid-Palaeozoic and older rocks from overlying Carboniferous formations, as on Franz Joseph Land and Svalbard. Subsequent latest Palaeozoic to Early Mesozoic orogeny, as on Taimyr, apparently had little influence on the Severnaya Zemlya successions.

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