Change search
Refine search result
1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the 'Create feeds' function.
  • 1. Little, Chelsea J.
    et al.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K.
    Molau, Ulf
    Alatalo, Juha M.
    Community and species-specific responses to simulated global change in two subarctic-alpine plant communities2015In: Ecosphere, ISSN 2150-8925, E-ISSN 2150-8925, Vol. 6, no 11, 1-18 p.Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Long-term observational studies have detected greening and shrub encroachment in the subarctic attributed to current climate change, while global change simulations have showed that community composition and productivity may shift drastically in arctic, subarctic, and alpine tundra plant communities in the future. However, responses to global change can be highly species- and context-dependent. We examined community-level and species-specific responses to a six-year factorial temperature and nutrient (nitrogen and phosphorus) amendment experiment in two alpine plant communities in northern Sweden: a species-poor dwarf shrub heath, and a more species-rich meadow. We hypothesized that abundance responses to global change would be variable within commonly defined vascular plant functional groups (e.g., forbs, evergreen shrubs, deciduous shrubs) and that new species would appear in experimental plots over time due to the ameliorated growing conditions. We found that within most functional groups, species were highly individualistic with respect to the global change simulation, particularly within the forbs, whereas within the shrubs, responses were neutral to negative and widely variable in magnitude. In the heath community the response of the graminoid functional group was driven almost entirely by the grass Calamagrostis lapponica, which increased in abundance by an order of magnitude in the combined temperature and nutrient treatment. Furthermore, community context was important for species’ responses to the simulations. Abundance of the pan-arctic species Carex bigelowii and Vaccinium vitis-idaea responded primarily to the temperature treatment in the meadow community whereas the nutrient treatment had stronger effects in the heath community. Over six growing seasons, more new species appeared in the experimental plots than in control plots in the meadow community, whereas in the heath community only one new species appeared. Our results from two closely situated but different plant communities show that functional groups do not predict individual species responses to simulated global change, and that these responses depend to a large extent on pre-existing physical conditions as well as biotic interactions such as competition and facilitation. It may be difficult to apply general trends of global change responses to specific local communities.

  • 2. Timling, I.
    et al.
    Dahlberg, A.
    Walker, D. A.
    Gardes, M.
    Charcosset, J. Y.
    Welker, J. M.
    Taylor, D. L.
    Distribution and drivers of ectomycorrhizal fungal communities across the North American Arctic2012In: Ecosphere, ISSN 2150-8925, Vol. 3, no 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ectomycorrhizal fungi (EMF) form symbioses with a few plant species that comprise a large fraction of the arctic vegetation. Despite their importance, the identity, abundance and distribution of EMF in the Arctic, as well as the key drivers controlling their community composition are poorly understood. In this study, we investigated the diversity and structure of EMF communities across a bioclimatic gradient spanning much of the North American Arctic. We collected roots from two principal arctic ectomycorrhizal host plants, Salix arctica and Dryas integrifolia, typically growing intermingled, at 23 locations stratified across the five bioclimatic subzones of the Arctic. DNA was extracted from ectomycorrhizal root tips and the ITS region was sequenced and phylogenetically analyzed. A total of 242 fungal Operational Taxonomic Units (OTUs) were documented, with 203 OTUs belonging to the Basidiomycota and 39 to the Ascomycota, exceeding the number of previously morphologically described EMF in the Arctic. EMF communities were dominated by a few common and species-rich families such as Thelephoraceae, Inocybaceae, Sebacinaceae, Cortinariaceae, and Pyronemataceae. Both host plants showed similar species richness, with 176 OTUs on Salix arctica and 154 OTUs on Dryas integrifolia. Host plant identity did not affect EMF community composition. The ten most abundant OTUs had a wide geographic distribution throughout the Arctic, and were also found in boreal, temperate and Mediterranean regions, where they were associated with a variety of hosts. Species richness did not decline with increasing latitude. However, EMF community structure changed gradually across the bioclimatic gradient with the greatest similarity between neighboring bioclimatic subzones and locations. EMF community structure was correlated with environmental factors at a regional scale, corresponding to a complex of glaciation history, geology, soil properties, plant productivity and climate. This is the first large-scale study of EMF communities across all five bioclimatic subzones of the North American Arctic, accompanied by an extensive set of environmental factors analyzed to date. While our study provides baseline data to assess shifts of plant and fungi distribution in response to climate change, it also suggests that with ongoing climate warming, EMF community composition may be affected by northward shifts of some taxa.

1 - 2 of 2
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf