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  • 1.
    Avango, Dag
    Arctic Centre, University of Groningen, The Netherlands.
    Integrating the Human Dimension in IPY 2007–2009: Reflections on the Achievements in Sweden2009In: Journal of Northern Studies, ISSN 1654-5915, no 2, p. 123-127Article in journal (Other academic)
  • 2.
    Avango, Dag
    et al.
    KTH, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö.
    Nilsson, Annika
    Roberts, Peder
    KTH, Historiska studier av teknik, vetenskap och miljö.
    Assessing Arctic Futures: Voices, Resources, and Governance2013In: The Polar Journal, ISSN 2154-896X, E-ISSN 2154-8978, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 431-446Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Interest in the future of the Arctic is running high, motivated in large part by belief that climate change will open new possibilities (and unleash new threats). Wealth from shipping and natural resource extraction features prominently in narratives about the Arctic in the media, and governance of the region has become a major concern as new actors demand influence. We use three components of current discourse about the Arctic to help reveal connections between how the region is constructed and how the right to decide its future is articulated. Voices are the actors who participate in the discursive construction of Arctic futures, with varying degrees of influence. Resources are objects upon which actors inscribe values, thus locating them in the discourse. Governance refers to the structural features through which action is regulated within spaces, restricting also the range of legitimate actors. We demonstrate the usefulness of these concepts through brief case studies of coal on Spitsbergen, hydrocarbons in the Barents Sea and whaling in the North Atlantic. We conclude by emphasizing the value of a historical perspective to understanding contemporary debates about the future of the Arctic.

  • 3. Christensen, T R
    et al.
    Panikov, N
    Mastepanov, M
    Joabsson, A
    Stewart, A
    Oquist, M
    Sommerkorn, M
    Reynaud, S
    Svensson, B
    Biotic controls on CO2 and CH4 exchange in wetlands - a closed environment study2003In: Biogeochemistry, ISSN 0168-2563, E-ISSN 1573-515X, Vol. 64, no 3, p. 337-354Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Wetlands are significant sources of the important greenhouse gas CH4. Here we explore the use of an experimental system developed for the determination of continuous fluxes of CO2 and CH4 in closed ecosystem monoliths including the capture of (CO2)-C-14 and (CH4)-C-14 following pulse labelling with (CO2)-C-14. We show that, in the ecosystem studied, ebullition (bubble emission) may account for 18 to 50% of the total CH4 emission, representing fluxes that have been difficult to estimate accurately in the past. Furthermore, using plant removal and C-14 labelling techniques, we use the system to detail the direct influence of vascular plants on CH4 emission. This influence is observed to be dependent on the amount of vascular plants present. The results that may be produced using the presented experimental set-up have implications for an improved understanding of wetland ecosystem/atmosphere interactions, including possible feedback effects on climate change. In recent years much attention has been devoted to ascertaining and subsequently using the relationship between net ecosystem productivity and CH4 emission as a basis for extrapolation of fluxes across large areas. The experimental system presented may be used to study the complex relationship between vascular plants and CH4 emission and here we show examples of how this may vary considerably in nature between and even within ecosystems.

  • 4. Christensen, TR
    et al.
    Ekberg, A
    Strom, L
    Mastepanov, M
    Panikov, N
    Mats, O
    Svensson, Bo
    Linköpings universitet, Tema vatten i natur och samhälle.
    Nykanen, H
    Martikainen, PJ
    Oskarsson, H
    Factors controlling large scale variations in methane emissions from wetlands2003In: Geophysical Research Letters, ISSN 0094-8276, E-ISSN 1944-8007, Vol. 30, no 7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    [1] Global wetlands are, at estimate ranging 115-237 Tg CH4/yr, the largest single atmospheric source of the greenhouse gas methane (CH4). We present a dataset on CH4 flux rates totaling 12 measurement years at sites from Greenland, Iceland, Scandinavia and Siberia. We find that temperature and microbial substrate availability (expressed as the organic acid concentration in peat water) combined explain almost 100% of the variations in mean annual CH4 emissions. The temperature sensitivity of the CH4 emissions shown suggests a feedback mechanism on climate change that could validate incorporation in further developments of global circulation models.

  • 5.
    Gallardo, Gloria
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Uppsala centrum för hållbar utveckling, CSD Uppsala.
    Saunders, Fred
    Södertörn Högskola.
    Sokolova, Tatiana
    Börebäck, Kristina
    Stockholm University.
    van Laerhoven, Frank
    Utrecht University, Netherlands.
    Kokko, Suvi
    Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences.
    Tuvendal, Magnus
    Stockholm University.
    We adapt … but is it good or bad?: Locating the political ecology and social-ecological systems debate in reindeer herding in the Swedish Sub-Arctic2017In: Journal of political ecology, ISSN 1073-0451, E-ISSN 1073-0451, Vol. 24, p. 667-670Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Reindeer herding (RDH) is a livelihood strategy deeply connected to Sami cultural tradition. This article explores the implications of two theoretical and methodological approaches for grasping complex socioenvironmental relationships of RDH in Subarctic Sweden. Based on joint fieldwork, two teams – one that aligns itself with political ecology (PE) and the other with social-ecological systems (SES) – compared PE and SES approaches of understanding RDH. Our purpose was twofold: 1) to describe the situation of Sami RDH through the lenses of PE and SES, exploring how the two approaches interpret the same empirical data; 2) to present an analytical comparison of the ontological and epistemological assumptions of this work, also inferring different courses of action to instigate change for the sustainability of RDH. Key informants from four sameby in the Kiruna region expressed strong support for the continuation of RDH as a cultural andeconomic practice. Concerns about the current situation raised by Sami representatives centered on the cumulative negative impacts on RDH from mining, forestry and tourism. PE and SES researchers offered dissimilar interpretations of the key aspects of the RDH socio-economic situation, namely: the nature and scale of RDH systems; the ubiquitous role of conflict; and conceptualizations of responses to changing socioenvironmental conditions. Due to these disparities, PE and SES analyses have radically divergent sociopolitical implications for what ought to be done to redress the current RDH situation

  • 6. Jacobsson, Marie
    Antarktis - om sydpolens historik, juridik och politik (Antarctica: on the history, law and politics ofthe South Pole)1992Report (Other (popular science, discussion, etc.))
  • 7. Nikodinoska, Natasha
    et al.
    Paletto, Alessandro
    Franzese, Pier Paolo
    Jonasson, Christer
    Valuation of Ecosystem Services in Protected Areas: The Case of the Abisko National Park (Sweden)2015In: Journal of Environmental Accounting and Management, ISSN 2325-6192, E-ISSN 2325-6206, Vol. 3, no 4, p. 355-369Article in journal (Refereed)
  • 8. Tolvanen, Anne
    et al.
    Forbes, Bruce
    Wall, Sandra
    Mittuniversitetet, Institutionen för samhällsvetenskap.
    Norokorpi, Yrjö
    Recreation at treeline and interactions with other land use activities2005In: Plant Ecology, Herbivory, and Human Impact in Nordic Mountain Birch Forests, Berlin: Springer , 2005, p. 203-217Chapter in book (Other academic)
  • 9.
    Viippola, Lotta
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Citizen Science i Abisko: Hur ser förutsättningarna ut inom forskning i nordliga ekosystem?2015Independent thesis Basic level (university diploma), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    In this paper I examine the possibilities for researchers in the field of climate change in the arctic ecosystems to collaborate with people of the common public for monitoring or to answer scientific questions, sometimes called Citizen Science. I have done this by focusing on the research community of Abisko, northern Sweden. I present a number of examples of possible projects that I have collected through literature, interviews and field work with researchers. Furthermore, I argue that Citizen Science projects might be a tool for nature guides in reaching adventurous visitors searching for more understanding of climate change, ecosystems, and who also want to contribute to real science. However, Citizen Science can also be a part of the democratization of a community when local people get engaged. Thus different aspects of Citizen Science are suitable for different target groups.

  • 10.
    Watier, Caroline
    KTH, Industriell ekologi (flyttat 20130630).
    Environmental Monitoring at Swedish Research Stations in Antarctica2008Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Establishing and implementing a long-term environmental monitoring programme in PolarRegions is both a complex and multidisciplinary field which requires participation andinvolvement of a great number of specialists on diverse and varied topics.The Swedish Polar Research Secretariat, responsible to promote and coordinate polarresearch, has always had the ambition to protect the Antarctic’s environment and theassociated and dependent ecosystems. In accordance with the Protocol on environmentalprotection in Antarctica, the secretariat has implemented an environmental monitoringprogramme since the beginning of the 1990’s. However, the output is not fullycomprehensive: on the one hand, it has provided necessary information on the understandingof the area and permitted to take mitigation measures, on the other hand, sporadic measuresand inappropriate data management system has left gaps in the environmental knowledge ofthe area.That is why, within the International Polar Year framework, the secretariat has decided toimplement a complete long-term environmental monitoring programme to not only evaluateimpacts from anthropogenic activities around the Swedish polar stations Wasa and Svea butalso to estimate their trend.The success of such programme depends on several key elements: feasible and clearly definedobjectives, a standardized sampling programme and an efficient data management system.Moreover, this programme should be strongly linked with the decision-making process andinternational cooperation would make this programme even more valuable.As science advancement continues, the need to protect the Antarctic’s environment becomemore and more obvious, indeed, we know that this continent maybe keeps in its ice answers totomorrow’s environmental questions.

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