Change search
Refine search result
1 - 25 of 25
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Rows per page
  • 5
  • 10
  • 20
  • 50
  • 100
  • 250
Sort
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
  • Standard (Relevance)
  • Author A-Ö
  • Author Ö-A
  • Title A-Ö
  • Title Ö-A
  • Publication type A-Ö
  • Publication type Ö-A
  • Issued (Oldest first)
  • Issued (Newest first)
  • Created (Oldest first)
  • Created (Newest first)
  • Last updated (Oldest first)
  • Last updated (Newest first)
  • Disputation date (earliest first)
  • Disputation date (latest first)
Select
The maximal number of hits you can export is 250. When you want to export more records please use the Create feeds function.
  • 1. Blåhed, Ida-Maria
    et al.
    Königsson, Helena
    Ericsson, Göran
    Spong, Göran
    Discovery of SNPs for individual identification by reduced representation sequencing of moose (Alces alces)2018In: PLOS ONE, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 1-14, article id e0197364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Monitoring of wild animal populations is challenging, yet reliable information about population processes is important for both management and conservation efforts. Access to molecular markers, such as SNPs, enables population monitoring through genotyping of various DNA sources. We have developed 96 high quality SNP markers for individual identification of moose (Alces alces), an economically and ecologically important top-herbivore in boreal regions. Reduced representation libraries constructed from 34 moose were high-throughput de novo sequenced, generating nearly 50 million read pairs. About 50 000 stacks of aligned reads containing one or more SNPs were discovered with the Stacks pipeline. Several quality criteria were applied on the candidate SNPs to find markers informative on the individual level and well representative for the population. An empirical validation by genotyping of sequenced individuals and additional moose, resulted in the selection of a final panel of 86 high quality autosomal SNPs. Additionally, five sex-specific SNPs and five SNPs for sympatric species diagnostics are included in the panel. The genotyping error rate was 0.002 for the total panel and probability of identities were low enough to separate individuals with high confidence. Moreover, the autosomal SNPs were highly informative also for population level analyses. The potential applications of this SNP panel are thus many including investigations of population size, sex ratios, relatedness, reproductive success and population structure. Ideally, SNP-based studies could improve today’s population monitoring and increase our knowledge about moose population dynamics.

  • 2.
    Breitling, Rainer
    et al.
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, UK.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Epigean spiders at Abisko Scientific Research Station in Swedish Lapland (Arachnida:Araneae)2015In: The Bulletin of the British Arachnological Society, ISSN 0524-4994, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 287-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Torneträsk area, including the Abisko National Park, Sweden, is arachnologically one of the best explored sites of Fennoscandia. Here we report the results of pitfall trapping at Abisko Scientific Research Station during the summers of 2004 and 2005, recording 791 individuals of 62 species of spiders. As expected, at the species level, samples were dominated by members of the Linyphiidae, while at the level of individuals Pardosa hyperborea and other lycosids were dominant. Two subsites, on heath and bog, differed substantially in their species profile: 7 species were statistically overrepresented on the drier heath site, while 2 species showed a strong preference for the wetter bog site. The samples also contained the first reported lateral gynadromorph of Archaeodictyna consecuta (Dictynidae). This study, from 195 km north of the Arctic Circle, provides important reference data for continued studies on the long-term effects of climate change on arctic ecosystems.

  • 3. Hedh, Linus
    et al.
    Dänhardt, Juliana
    Hedenström, Anders
    Population specific annual cycles and migration strategies in a leap-frog migrant2022In: Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology, ISSN 0340-5443, E-ISSN 1432-0762, Vol. 76, no 2Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A common migratory pattern in birds is that northerly breeding populations migrate to more southerly non-breeding sites compared to southerly breeding populations (leap-frog migration). Not only do populations experience differences in migration distances, but also different environmental conditions, which may vary spatiotemporally within their annual cycles, creating distinctive selective pressures and migratory strategies. Information about such adaptations is important to understand migratory drivers and evolution of migration patterns. We use light-level geolocators and citizen science data on regional spring arrivals to compare two populations of common ringed plover Charadrius hiaticula breeding at different latitudes. We (1) describe and characterize the annual cycles and (2) test predictions regarding speed and timing of migration. The northern breeding population (NBP) wintered in Africa and the southern (SBP) mainly in Europe. The annual cycles were shifted temporally so that the NBP was always later in all stages. The SBP spent more than twice as long time in the breeding area, but there was no difference in winter. The NBP spent more time on migration in general. Spring migration speed was lower in the SBP compared to autumn speed of both populations, and there was no difference in autumn and spring speed in the NBP. We also found a larger variation in spring arrival times across years in the SBP. This suggests that a complex interaction of population specific timing and variation of breeding onset, length of breeding season, and proximity to the breeding area shape the annual cycle and migratory strategies.

  • 4.
    Hedlund, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Climate change effects on migratory birds and on the ecology and behaviour of the willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus)2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent global climate change is influencing the behaviour and ecology of species worldwide. Birds are typical systems to study in this context, as they are often migratory and thus subjected to a variety of environmental effects. This thesis employs the use of long-term ringing records, field observations, historical maps and historical volunteer observations with the aim of describing behavioural and ecological responses of birds to the current environmental change. An investigation into the spring arrival, reproduction and autumn departure in willow warblers (Phylloscopus trochilus) breeding at a southern study site in Sweden (65°N 18°E) showed that all three phenological events had advanced in parallel. Thus birds arrive earlier, start breeding earlier and leave Sweden earlier, with the breeding period staying the same in length. By teasing apart the migratory responses of different individuals, it became clear that particularly early arriving males and early departing juveniles had advanced migration. However, willow warblers migrating past a northern study site in Sweden (65°N 23°E) displayed no change in autumn departure. When migration in the two regionally separate populations were analyzed in relation to climatic variables, the results indicated that foremost a combined effect of growing season onset and the North Atlantic Oscillation influenced migratory timing, and only in individuals that had advanced migration. As growing season onset had advanced at both regions, but only elicited migratory change in southern willow warblers, it is proposed that intra-specific difference between populations prepare them differently to climate change. Willow warblers breeding at northern latitudes were also displaying absence of an otherwise common behaviour of the species: philopatry. It is suggested that the climate induced change in onset of the growing season, coupled with an increase in available territories, could have enabled a southern influx of dispersal-prone birds adopting a less philopatric breeding behaviour. Availability of territories was also studied in southern Sweden, in relation to 100 years of land use change and future climate change effects on forestry. The mass-conversion of grazed forest into coniferous sylvicultures that has occurred in Sweden 1900-2013 was shown to have negatively affected territory availability for willow warblers. The second most common bird species in Sweden, the chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs), was however shown to be largely unaffected. In a future scenario where rising temperatures will increase growth rates of trees, harvest rotation will be faster and both sylvicultures and logged areas will increase in coverage, favouring both species. Thus commonness in terms of landscape and species occurrence has altered historically and is dynamically linked. Historic perspectives were also applied to observations of spring arrival of 14 migratory bird species. A relative comparison of two data sets, collected over 140 years, revealed that short-distance migrants have changed their spring arrival more than long-distance migrants in southern Sweden. In conclusion, the results of this thesis provide insights into climate change effects on avian behaviour and ecology, document unique observations and contribute with a great spectrum of knowledge, from exact details on responses by individual birds, through long-term changes in populations to historical perspectives on shifts in entire landscapes

  • 5. Karlsson, Dave
    et al.
    Hartop, Emily
    Forshage, Mattias
    Jaschhof, Mathias
    Ronquist, Fredrik
    The Swedish Malaise Trap Project: A 15 Year Retrospective on a Countrywide Insect Inventory2020In: Biodiversity Data Journal, ISSN 1314-2836, E-ISSN 1314-2828, Vol. 8, article id e47255Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Swedish Malaise Trap Project (SMTP) is one of the most ambitious insect inventories ever attempted. The project was designed to target poorly known insect groups across a diverse range of habitats in Sweden. The field campaign involved the deployment of 73 Malaise traps at 55 localities across the country for three years (2003-2006). Over the past 15 years, the collected material has been hand sorted by trained technicians into over 300 taxonomic fractions suitable for expert attention. The resulting collection is a tremendous asset for entomologists around the world, especially as we now face a desperate need for baseline data to evaluate phenomena like insect decline and climate change. Here, we describe the history, organisation, methodology and logistics of the SMTP, focusing on the rationale for the decisions taken and the lessons learned along the way. The SMTP represents one of the early instances of community science applied to large-scale inventory work, with a heavy reliance on volunteers in both the field and the laboratory. We give estimates of both staff effort and volunteer effort involved. The project has been funded by the Swedish Taxonomy Initiative; in total, the inventory has cost less than 30 million SEK (approximately 3.1 million USD). Based on a subset of the samples, we characterise the size and taxonomic composition of the SMTP material. Several different extrapolation methods suggest that the material comprises around 20 million specimens in total. The material is dominated by Diptera (75% of the specimens) and Hymenoptera (15% of specimens). Amongst the Diptera, the dominant groups are Chironomidae (37% of specimens), Sciaridae (15%), Phoridae (13%), Cecidomyiidae (9.5%) and Mycetophilidae (9.4%). Within Hymenoptera, the major groups are Ichneumonidae (44% of specimens), Diaprioidea (19%), Braconidae (9.6%), Platygastroidea (8.5%) and Chalcidoidea (7.9%). The taxonomic composition varies with latitude and season. Several Diptera and Hymenoptera groups are more common in non-summer samples (collected from September to April) and in the North, while others show the opposite pattern. About 1% of the total material has been processed and identified by experts so far. This material represents over 4,000 species. One third of these had not been recorded from Sweden before and almost 700 of them are new to science. These results reveal the large amounts of taxonomic work still needed on Palaearctic insect faunas. Based on the SMTP experiences, we discuss aspects of planning and conducting future large-scale insect inventory projects using mainly traditional approaches in relation to more recent approaches that rely on molecular techniques.

  • 6.
    Keehnen, Naomi L. P.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Kučerová, Lucie
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för molekylär biovetenskap, Wenner-Grens institut.
    Nylin, Sören
    Stockholms universitet, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Theopold, Ulrich
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för molekylär biovetenskap, Wenner-Grens institut.
    Wheat, Christopher W.
    Stockholms universitet, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Physiological Tradeoffs of Immune Response Differs by Infection Type in Pieris napi2021In: Frontiers in Physiology, E-ISSN 1664-042X, Vol. 11, article id 576797Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Understanding the tradeoffs that result from successful infection responses is central to understanding how life histories evolve. Gaining such insights, however, can be challenging, as they may be pathogen specific and confounded with experimental design. Here, we investigated whether infection from gram positive or negative bacteria results in different physiological tradeoffs, and whether these infections impact life history later in life (post-diapause development), in the butterfly Pieris napi. During the first 24 h after infection (3, 6, 12, and 24 h), after removing effects due to injection, larvae infected with Micrococcus luteus showed a strong suppression of all non-immunity related processes while several types of immune responses were upregulated. In contrast, this tradeoff between homeostasis and immune response was much less pronounced in Escherichia coli infections. These differences were also visible long after infection, via weight loss and slower development, as well as an increased mortality at higher infection levels during later stages of development. Individuals infected with M. luteus, compared to E. coli, had a higher mortality rate, and a lower pupal weight, developmental rate and adult weight. Further, males exhibited a more negative impact of infection than females. Thus, immune responses come at a cost even when the initial infection has been overcome, and these costs are likely to affect later life history parameters with fitness consequences.

  • 7. Krzemiñska, Ewa
    Two species with ventral receptacles in Trichocera MEIGEN (Diptera: Trichoceridae): Trichoceridae)2020In: Acta Zoologica Cracoviensia, ISSN 0065-1710, Vol. 63, no 1, p. 1-7Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The ventral receptacle is a kind of a sperm storage shaped as an elongated pouch and positioned at the ventral side of female genitalia. It is a novelty and an alternative system to the spermathecae present in a vast majority of Diptera, and insects in general. Among the Diptera the ventral receptacle is present in the families of Brachycera Acalyptrata; the subgenus Trichocera (Staryia) is the only taxon among the entire Diptera Nematocera known to date in which the ventral receptacle was found. The subgenus comprises 13 species known from northern and central Europe. In this paper two new species of Staryia are described, one from Switzerland, and the other from Scandinavia. Additionally, a revised description of a female of T. (Metatrichocera) gigantea DAHL, 1967, is provided, based on specimens from the far eastern locality in Siberia.

  • 8. Lehnert, K.
    et al.
    Weirup, L.
    Harding, K. C.
    Harkonen, T.
    Karisson, O.
    Teilmann, J.
    Antarctic seals: Molecular biomarkers as indicators for pollutant exposure, health effects and diet2017In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 599, p. 1693-1704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Weddell (Leptonychotes weddellii), Ross (Ommatophoca rossii) and crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) are phocid seals with a circumpolar distribution around Antarctica. As long-lived and large top predators, they bioaccumulate contaminants and are considered as sentinels of ecosystem health. Antarctic seals are increasingly exposed to climate change, pollution, shipping and fisheries. To reveal and understand possible anthropogenic impacts on their immune and health status, this study investigates sensitive biomarkers of the xenobiotic metabolism and immune system in relation to mercury (Hg) burden. Gene-transcription studies using minimally invasive blood samples are useful to monitor physiological processes in wildlife that can be related to different stressors. Blood samples of 72 wild-caught seals (Weddell n = 33; Ross n = 12; crabeater n = 27) in the Amundsen and Ross Seas in 2008-2011 were investigated. Copy numbers per mu l mRNA transcription of xenobiotic biomarkers (aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)), aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR alpha) and immune relevant cell mediators (cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and heat-shock-protein 70 (HSP70)) were measured using reference genes Tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein, zeta polypeptide (YWHAZ) and ribosomal protein L4 (RPL4) by real time RT-qPCR. Hg concentration was analysed in fur. Hg concentration increased with body weight and standard length in all species. Crabeater seals showed a lower Hg concentration than Ross and Weddell seals. Species-specific differences in gene-transcription were found between all species with highest levels of AHR, ARNT and PPARa in crabeater seals. Ross seals showed highest IL-10 and HSP70 transcription, while HSP70 was exceptionally low in crabeater seals. Between Hg and HSP70 a clear negative relationship was found in all species. The species-specific, age and sex-dependent gene-transcription probably reflect dietary habits, pollutant exposure and immune status. (C) 2017 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 9.
    Lindén, Elin
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Gough, Laura
    Department of Biological Sciences, Towson University, MD, Towson, United States.
    Olofsson, Johan
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Large and small herbivores have strong effects on tundra vegetation in Scandinavia and Alaska2021In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 11, no 17, p. 12141-12152Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Large and small mammalian herbivores are present in most vegetated areas in the Arctic and often have large impacts on plant community composition and ecosystem functioning. The relative importance of different herbivores and especially how their specific impact on the vegetation varies across the Arctic is however poorly understood. Here, we investigate how large and small herbivores influence vegetation density and plant community composition in four arctic vegetation types in Scandinavia and Alaska. We used a unique set of exclosures, excluding only large (reindeer and muskoxen) or all mammalian herbivores (also voles and lemmings) for at least 20 years. We found that mammalian herbivores in general decreased leaf area index, NDVI, and abundance of vascular plants in all four locations, even though the strength of the effect and which herbivore type caused these effects differed across locations. In three locations, herbivore presence caused contrasting plant communities, but not in the location with lowest productivity. Large herbivores had a negative effect on plant height, whereas small mammalian herbivores increased species diversity by decreasing dominance of the initially dominating plant species. Above- or belowground disturbances caused by herbivores were found to play an important role in shaping the vegetation in all locations. Synthesis: Based on these results, we conclude that both small and large mammalian herbivores influence vegetation in Scandinavia and Alaska in a similar way, some of which can mitigate effects of climate change. We also see important differences across locations, but these depend rather on local herbivore and plant community composition than large biogeographical differences among continents.

  • 10. Liston, Andrew
    et al.
    Prous, Marko
    Vårdal, Hege
    The West Palaearctic Dineura species, focussing on Sweden (Hymenoptera, Tenthredinidae)2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4612, no 4Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four Dineura species are now considered to occur in the West Palaearctic, including northern Europe, but D. parcivalvis has not been found in Scandinavia. Dineura pullior Schmidt & Walter, 1995 is treated as a new junior subjective synonym of D. virididorsata (Retzius, 1783). An illustrated key to adults is presented. Lectotypes are designated for seven nominal taxa: Dineura stilata var. virilis Enslin, 1918, Dineura testaceipes var. nigriventris Enslin, 1915, Dineura virididorsata var. dorsalis Enslin, 1915, Nematus posticus Förster, 1854, Nematus xanthocerus Hartig, 1840, Nematus xanthopus Zaddach, 1876and Tenthredo (Allantus) stilata Klug, 1816. Distributions in the Fennoscandian countries are outlined, with particular reference to Sweden.

  • 11.
    Liston, Andrew
    et al.
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Eberswalder Straße 90, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany..
    Prous, Marko
    Senckenberg Deutsches Entomologisches Institut, Eberswalder Straße 90, 15374 Müncheberg, Germany.
    Vårdal, Hege
    Naturhistoriska riksmuseet, Enheten för zoologi.
    The West Palaearctic Pseudodineura and Endophytus species (Hymenoptera, Tenthredinidae)2019In: Zootaxa, ISSN 1175-5326, E-ISSN 1175-5334, Vol. 4614, no 3, p. 511-528Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Six valid species of Pseudodineura are now recognised as occurring in the West Palaearctic, and the only described species of the related genus Endophytus. Larvae of all species are leaf-miners in Ranunculaceae. An identification key to adults is provided, followed by species commentaries which include summarised data on taxonomy, larval host plants, and distribution, with particular reference to Sweden. Whereas identification of some specimens using morphological characters may not be possible, each species apparently has a distinct COI barcode sequence. Pseudodineura heringi(Enslin, 1921) is a new junior synonym of P. parvula (Klug, 1816). Pseudodineura mocsaryi Zombori, 1976 and P. scaligera Zombori, 1979 are new junior synonyms of P. clematidisrectae Hering, 1935. Lectotypes are designated for: Dolerus minutus Hartig, 1837, Pelmatopus clematidis Hering, 1932, P. enslini Hering, 1923, P. heringi Enslin, 1921, and P. mentiens var. konowi Enslin, 1921.

    Download full text (pdf)
    FULLTEXT01
  • 12.
    Markl, Gregor
    et al.
    Department of Geosciences, University of Tübingen, Tübingen, Germany.
    Ottmann, Shannon
    Haasis, Tobias
    Budach, Daniela
    Krais, Stefanie
    Köhler, Heinz-R.
    Thermobiological effects of temperature-induced color variations in Aglais urticae (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae)2022In: Ecology and Evolution, E-ISSN 2045-7758, Vol. 12, no 6Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Coloration of animals is important for camouflage, for social behavior, or for physiological fitness. This study investigates the color variation in adults of Aglais urticae obtained on subjecting some pre-imaginal stages to different temperature conditions and their thermobiological consequences. To investigate the evolutionary?ecological interactions of temperature and pigmentation in butterflies, caterpillars, and pupae of the small tortoiseshell, Aglais urticae (Lepidoptera, Nymphalidae), larvae from Central Europe and Scandinavia were reared at temperatures between 7 and 34°C in the laboratory or in the field. After emergence, the intensity of pigmentation of the imagines and their increase in body temperature under defined full-spectrum light irradiation were quantified by image analysis and thermal imaging. At constant conditions, ambient rearing temperature and pigmentation intensity of imagines were negatively and linearly correlated in Central European butterflies, regardless of whether the pupal stage alone or, additionally, the last period of the larval stage was exposed to these conditions: low temperatures induced darker coloration and high temperatures led to lighter individuals. A thermal pulse of a few days alone at the beginning of pupal dormancy led to a similar, albeit weakened, effect. Caterpillars of the Scandinavian subspecies A. urticae polaris, whose pupal dormancy took place under Central European field conditions, developed into strongly pigmented imagines. The thermobiological relevance of more intense pigmentation was shown by significantly higher absorption of light, and thus stronger increased body temperature after 5 min of defined illumination, but this difference ceased after 15 min. Our results show that phenotypic plasticity in wing coloration is adaptive since temperature-induced developmental changes provide thermobiological benefit in adult butterflies. We propose that, in subpolar latitudes, darker coloration likely has a selection advantage favoring individuals with reaction norms gradually shifted to stronger pigmented phenotypes, possibly leading to the establishment of a pigmentation cline.

  • 13.
    Martinet, B.
    et al.
    Laboratory of Zoology, University of Mons; Evolutionary Biology and Ecology, Université Libre de Bruxelles.
    Przybyla, K.
    Laboratory of Zoology, University of Mons.
    Atkins, J.
    Bosiger, Y.
    Evrard, D.
    Gill, P.
    van Alphen, J.
    Whyte, G.
    Rasmont, P.
    Description of nest architecture and ecological notes on the bumblebee Bombus (Pyrobombus) lapponicus (Hymenoptera Apidae: Bombini)2022In: Insectes Sociaux, ISSN 0020-1812, E-ISSN 1420-9098, Vol. 69, no 1, p. 131-135Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Little information is known about the nesting behaviour of arctic and boreal bumblebee species. The arctic is an environment with hard eco-climatic constraints notably for bumblebees. Here, we describe the nest of a common circum boreal species, Bombus lapponicus. A natural nest was discovered from an abandoned rodent nest (Microtus oeconomus) at 560 m. at Björkliden (Sweden) on June 14, 2021. The nest was 10 cm under the ground and at the end of a 1-meter-long sinuous tunnel. When discovered, the nest was wrapped in rodent straw and consisted of a nectar pot and 11 cells. The architecture of the brood had a horseshoe shape, consistent with other bumblebee nests already described. Before nest excavation, we observed the queen's comings and goings during a whole day to determine the time spent inside the nest to take care of the brood and the time spent outside to collect nutritive resources. The development of the brood was continued in the laboratory until the emergence of sexuates.

  • 14. Martinet, Baptiste
    et al.
    Brasero, Nicolas
    Lecocq, Thomas
    Biella, Paolo
    Valterová, Irena
    Michez, Denis
    Rasmont, Pierre
    Adding attractive semio-chemical trait refines the taxonomy of Alpinobombus (Hymenoptera: Apidae)2018In: Apidologie, ISSN 0044-8435, E-ISSN 1297-9678, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 838-851Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Species taxonomy of bumblebees (Bombus Latreille, 1802) is well known to be problematic due to a potentially high intra-specific variability of morphological traits while different species can converge locally to the same color pattern (cryptic species). Assessing species delimitation remains challenging because it requires to arbitrarily select variable traits whose accuracy continues to be debated. Integrative taxonomic approach seems to be very useful for this group as different independent traits are assessed to propose a rational taxonomic hypothesis. Among operational criteria to assess specific status, the reproductive traits involved in the pre-mating recognition (i.e., the male cephalic labial gland secretions, CLGS) have been premium information. Since these secretions are supposed to be species-specific, these chemical traits can bring essential information where species delimitation is debated. Here, we describe and compare the CLGS of 161 male specimens of nine Alpinobombus taxa: alpinus, balteatus, helleri, hyperboreus, kirbiellus, natvigi, neoboreus, polaris, and pyrrhopygus. We aim also to test the congruence between this new information (reproductive traits) and published genetic dataset. Our results emphasized six distinct groups with diagnostic major compounds: (a) alpinus + helleri with hexadec-9-en-1-ol; (b) polaris + pyrrhopygus with two major compounds hexadec-9-en-1-ol and hexadec-9-enal; (c) balteatus with tetradecyl acetate; (d) kirbiellus with geranyl geranyl acetate; (e) hyperboreus + natvigi with octadec-11-en-1-ol; (f) neoboreus with octadec-9-en-1-ol. Based on this new information, we can confirm the species status of B. alpinus, B. balteatus, B. hyperboreus, B. kirbiellus, B. neoboreus, and B. polaris. We also confirm the synonymy of helleri (Alps) with alpinus (Sweden). However, the specific status of natvigi (Alaska) and pyrrhopygus (Sweden) is questionable and these taxa do not have specific CLGS composition.

  • 15.
    Marusik, Yuri M.
    et al.
    Institute for Biological Problems of the North, FEB Russian Academy of Sciences, Portovaya Str. 18, Magadan 685000 Russia.
    Alfimov, Arcady V.
    Institute for Biological Problems of the North, FEB Russian Academy of Sciences, Portovaya Str. 18, Magadan 685000 Russia.
    Unexpected diversity of wandering spiders (Aranei: Gnaphosidae, Philodromidae, Salticidae) of Northeastern Siberia2022In: Arthropoda Selecta, Vol. 31, no 4, p. 527-532Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    It was found that diversity of spidersin Kolyma River delta (68.66º–69.25ºN), located in thesouthern tundra, is about the same as in four other wellstudied local spider faunas located above the PolarCircle in boreal and tundra zones. But three families,Gnaphosidae, Philodromidae and Salticidae, have higherspecies diversity in the Kolyma River delta than inother local faunas of the boreal and tundra zones. Tounderstand reasons for this phenomenon, we comparedzoogeographical aspects of spiders from NortheasternSiberia and Finland and analyzed climate and microclimates indicators in five localities. Most likely the highest species diversity of named families in the tundrazone and even highest diversity among all local faunaslying north of Polar Circle can be explained by a combination of two major factors: history and microclimate. The Kolyma River delta was never covered bythe ice shield like other compared areas; and its highclimate continentality led to a higher heat supply of thesoil surface in the warmest habitats.

  • 16. Mörs, Thomas
    et al.
    Reguero, Marcelo
    Vasilyan, Davit
    First fossil frog from Antarctica: implications for Eocene high latitude climate conditions and Gondwanan cosmopolitanism of Australobatrachia2020In: Scientific Reports, E-ISSN 2045-2322, Vol. 10, no 1, article id 5051Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Cenozoic ectothermic continental tetrapods (amphibians and reptiles) have not been documented previously from Antarctica, in contrast to all other continents. Here we report a fossil ilium and an ornamented skull bone that can be attributed to the Recent, South American, anuran family Calyptocephalellidae or helmeted frogs, representing the first modern amphibian found in Antarctica. The two bone fragments were recovered in Eocene, approximately 40 million years old, sediments on Seymour Island, Antarctic Peninsula. The record of hyperossified calyptocephalellid frogs outside South America supports Gondwanan cosmopolitanism of the anuran clade Australobatrachia. Our results demonstrate that Eocene freshwater ecosystems in Antarctica provided habitats favourable for ectothermic vertebrates (with mean annual precipitation ≥900 mm, coldest month mean temperature ≥3.75 °C, and warmest month mean temperature ≥13.79 °C), at a time when there were at least ephemeral ice sheets existing on the highlands within the interior of the continent.

  • 17. Nokkala, Christina
    et al.
    Kuznetsova, Valentina G
    Rinne, Veikko
    Nokkala, Seppo
    Description of two new species of the genus Cacopsylla Ossiannilsson, 1970 (Hemiptera, Psylloidea) from northern Fennoscandia recognized by morphology, cytogenetic characters and COI barcode sequence2019In: Comparative Cytogenetics, ISSN 1993-0771, E-ISSN 1993-078X, Vol. 13, no 4, p. 367-382Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Based on chromosomal, molecular and morphological analyses, two new Cacopsylla Ossiannilsson, 1970 species are described, C. lapponica S. Nokkala & Ch. Nokkala, sp. nov. and C. borealis S. Nokkala et Ch. Nokkala, sp. nov. (HemipteraPsylloidea). C. lapponica is a rare bisexual alpine species living on Vaccinium uliginosum Linnaeus, 1753 above tree line on northern hills, where it forms sympatric populations with C. myrtilli W. Wagner, 1947. So far, the species has been found in northern Finland, Utsjoki and Kilpisjärvi, and in northern Sweden, Abisko. The chromosome number in males is 2n = 12+X(0), characteristic of psyllids. The species is easily distinguished from C. myrtilli by its conspicuously smaller size mainly due to difference in wing size. Additional morphological differences are found in the length of antennae, female genital plates and male parameres. C. borealis, in turn, is a relatively common apomictic parthenogenetic species with 5n = 60 + XXXXX living on the same host plant, Ledum palustre Linnaeus, 1753, as C. ledi (Flor, 1861) and occasionally forming sympatric populations with it. No males have been recorded in C. borealis. Its distribution range reaches at least from northern Fennoscandia to Lake Baikal in the East. C. borealis can be distinguished from C. ledi by differences in the length and width of antennae, dark brown markings on the wing and female terminal structures. For molecular analysis, a 638 bp fragment of the mitochondrial COI gene was sequenced. C. lapponica differs from the cohabitating C. myrtilli by 20 fixed nucleotide substitutions (uncor rected p-distance 3.13 %), while C. borealis differs from C. ledi by 21 fixed nucleotide substitutions (uncorrected p-distance 3.29 %). Molecular phylogeny construction (ML and BI) reveals two highly divergent clades, one comprising two bisexual species, C. lapponica and C. fraudatrix Labina & Kuznetsova, 2012, and the other clade comprising the parthenogenetic species C. borealisC. myrtilli, and C. ledi. Within this clade, C. borealis is more closely associated with C. myrtilli than with C. ledi.

  • 18.
    Pruisscher, Peter
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Larsdotter-Mellström, Helena
    Stockholms universitet, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Stefanescu, Constantí
    Nylin, Sören
    Stockholms universitet, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Wheat, Christopher W.
    Stockholms universitet, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Gotthard, Karl
    Stockholms universitet, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Sex-linked inheritance of diapause induction in the butterfly Pieris napi2017In: Physiological entomology (Print), ISSN 0307-6962, E-ISSN 1365-3032, Vol. 42, no 3, p. 257-265Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many temperate insects survive harsh environmental conditions, such as winter, by entering a state of developmental arrest. This diapause state is predominantly induced by photoperiod. The photoperiod varies with latitude and has led to local adaptation in the photoperiodic induction of diapause in many insects. To understand the rapid evolution of the photoperiodic threshold, it is important to investigate and understand the underlying genetic mechanisms. In the present study, the genetic basis of photoperiodic diapause induction is investigated in the green-veined white butterfly Pieris napi (Lepidoptera, Pieridae) by assaying diapause induction in a range of conditions for a Swedish and Spanish population. Furthermore, the inheritance of diapause induction is assessed in reciprocal F1 hybrids and backcrosses between the two populations. The southern population shows a clear photoperiodic threshold determining diapause or direct development, whereas the northern populations show a high incidence of diapause, regardless of photoperiod. The hybrid crosses reveal that the inheritance of diapause induction is strongly sex-linked, and that diapause incidence in the genetic crosses is highly dependent on photoperiod. This emphasizes the importance of assaying a range of conditions in diapause inheritance studies. The results indicate a strongly heritable diapause induction with a major component on the Z-chromosome, as well as a minor effect of the autosomal background.

  • 19. Rieksta, Jolanta
    et al.
    Li, Tao
    Junker, Robert R.
    Jepsen, Jane U.
    Ryde, Ingvild
    Rinnan, Riikka
    Insect Herbivory Strongly Modifies Mountain Birch Volatile Emissions2020In: Frontiers in Plant Science, E-ISSN 1664-462X, Vol. 11Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Insect herbivory is known to augment emissions of biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Yet few studies have quantified BVOC responses to insect herbivory in natural populations in pan-Arctic regions. Here, we assess how quantitative and qualitative BVOC emissions change with increasing herbivore feeding intensity in the Subarctic mountain birch (Betula pubescens var pumila (L.)) forest. We conducted three field experiments in which we manipulated the larval density of geometrid moths (Operophtera brumata and Epirrita autumnata), on branches of mountain birch and measured BVOC emissions using the branch enclosure method and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Our study showed that herbivory significantly increased BVOC emissions from the branches damaged by larvae. BVOC emissions increased due to insect herbivory at relatively low larvae densities, causing up to 10% of leaf area loss. Insect herbivory also changed the blend composition of BVOCs, with damaged plants producing less intercorrelated BVOC blends than undamaged ones. Our results provide a quantitative understanding of the relationship between the severity of insect herbivore damage and emissions of BVOCs at larvae densities corresponding to background herbivory levels in the Subarctic mountain birch. The results have important and practical implications for modeling induced and constitutive BVOC emissions and their feedbacks to atmospheric chemistry.

  • 20. Rieksta, Jolanta
    et al.
    Li, Tao
    Michelsen, Anders
    Rinnan, Riikka
    Synergistic effects of insect herbivory and changing climate on plant volatile emissions in the subarctic tundra2021In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. n/a, no n/aArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change increases the insect abundance, especially in Arctic ecosystems. Insect herbivory also significantly increases plant emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are highly reactive in the atmosphere and play a crucial role in atmospheric chemistry and physics. However, it is unclear how the effects of insect herbivory on VOC emissions interact with climatic changes, such as warming and increased cloudiness. We assessed how experimental manipulations of temperature and light availability in subarctic tundra, that had been maintained for 30 years at the time of the measurements, affect the VOC emissions from a widespread dwarf birch (Betula nana) when subjected to herbivory by local geometrid moth larvae, the autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata) and the winter moth (Operophtera brumata). Warming and insect herbivory on B. nana stimulated VOC emission rates and altered the VOC blend. The herbivory-induced increase in sesquiterpene and homoterpene emissions were climate-treatment-dependent. Many herbivory-associated VOCs were more strongly induced in the shading treatment than in other treatments. We showed generally enhanced tundra VOC emissions upon insect herbivory and synergistic effects on the emissions of some VOC groups in a changing climate, which can have positive feedbacks on cloud formation. Furthermore, the acclimation of plants to long-term climate treatments affects VOC emissions and strongly interacts with plant responses to herbivory. Such acclimation complicates predictions of how climate change, together with interacting biotic stresses, affects VOC emissions in the high latitudes.

  • 21. Simon, Jean-Christophe
    et al.
    Mahéo, Frédérique
    Mieuzet, Lucie
    Buchard, Christelle
    Gauthier, Jean-Pierre
    Maurice, Damien
    Bonhomme, Joël
    Outreman, Yannick
    Hullé, Maurice
    Life on the Edge: Ecological Genetics of a High Arctic Insect Species and Its Circumpolar Counterpart2019In: Insects, ISSN 2075-4450, E-ISSN 2075-4450, Vol. 10, no 12, article id 427Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Arctic ecosystems are subjected to strong environmental constraints that prevent both the colonization and development of many organisms. In Svalbard, few aphid species have established permanent populations. These high arctic aphid species have developed peculiar life-history traits such as shortened life cycles and reduced dispersal capacities. Here, we present data on the distribution and population genetics of Acyrthosiphon svalbardicum in Spitsbergen, the main island of the Svalbard archipelago, and compared its genetic structure with that of its close relative Acyrthosiphon brevicorne, sampled in the top of Scandinavian mainland. We found that A. svalbardicum is common but heterogeneously distributed along the west coast of Spitsbergen. We recorded this species up to 79°12’, which constitutes the northernmost location for any aphid. Genetic structure examined using microsatellite markers showed more pronounced spatial differentiation in A. svalbardicum than in A. brevicorne populations, presumably due to reduced dispersal capacities in the former species. Although populations of A. brevicorne and A. svalbardicum were well-delineated at nuclear loci, they shared similar cytoplasmic DNA haplotypes as revealed by sequence analysis of two DNA barcodes. These results raise questions about whether these two taxa are different species, and the colonization sources and history of the Svalbard archipelago by A. svalbardicum.

  • 22. Sjöstedt, B. Yngve
    Insektfaunan inom Abisko nationalpark, 1-3.1931Collection (editor) (Other academic)
  • 23. Swanson, Laura
    et al.
    Li, Tao
    Rinnan, Riikka
    Contrasting responses of major and minor volatile compounds to warming and gall-infestation in the Arctic willow Salix myrsinites2021In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 793, article id 148516Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is altering high-latitude ecosystems in multiple facets, including increased insect herbivory pressure and enhanced emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOC) from vegetation. Yet, joint impacts of climatic drivers and insect herbivory on VOC emissions from the Arctic remain largely unknown. We examined how one-month warming by open-top plastic tents, yielding a 3–4 °C air temperature increase, and the natural presence of gall-forming eriophyoid mites, Aculus tetanothrix, individually and in combination, affect VOC emissions from whortle leaved willow, Salix myrsinites, at two elevations in an Arctic heath tundra of Abisko, Northern Sweden. We measured VOC emissions three times in the peak growing season (July) from intact and gall-infested branches using an enclosure technique and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry, and leaf chemical composition using near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS). Isoprene accounted for 91% of the VOCs emitted by S. myrsinites. Isoprene emission rates tended to be higher at the high than low elevation during the measurement periods (42 μg g−1 DW h−1 vs. 23 μg g−1 DW h−1) even when temperature differences were accounted for. Experimental warming increased isoprene emissions by approximately 54%, but decreased emissions of some minor compound groups, such as green leaf volatiles (GLV) and (E)-4,8-dimethyl-1,3,7-nonatriene (DMNT). In contrast, gall-infestation did not affect isoprene emissions but stimulated emissions of DMNT, sesquiterpenes and GLVs, particularly under ambient conditions at the low elevation. The NIRS-based chemical composition of the leaves varied between the two elevations and was affected by warming and gall-infestation. Our study suggests that under elevated temperatures, S. myrsinites increases emissions of isoprene, a highly effective compound for protection against oxidative stress, while an infestation by A. tetanothrix mites induces emissions of herbivore enemy attractants like DMNT, sesquiterpenes and GLVs. Under both conditions, warming effects on isoprene remain but mite effects on DMNT, sesquiterpenes and GLVs diminish.

  • 24. Vikberg, Veli
    et al.
    Nupponen, Kari
    Nupponen, Timo
    Savolainen, Pekka
    Tahvanainen, Kari
    Tiittanen, Jukka
    Riedel, Matthias
    Ichneumonid parasitoids (Hymenoptera: Ichneumonidae) reared in North Europe from pupae of Chelis puengeleri (Bang-Haas, 1927) (Lepidoptera: Erebidae, Arctiinae)2019In: Entomologica Fennica, Vol. 30, no 3, p. 173-179Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Four ichneumonid species were reared for the first time from pupae of Chelis puengeleri in North Europe. One female of Pimpla sodalis Ruthe, 1859 (Pimplinae) was reared in Cievrracohkka, N Sweden in July 2012. One male of Ichneumon formosus Gravenhorst, 1829 (Ichneumoninae) was reared in Nissuntjårro, Torne Lappland, Sweden in July 2012. One male of Ichneumon vafer Tischbein, 1876 (Ichneumoninae) was reared in July 1999 in the Iremel Mountain reserve, Baskiria, South Ural, Russia. Two females and one male of Ichneumon holoarctiae Riedel et Vikberg sp. n. (Ichneumoninae) were reared in June and July 2004 and 2012 in Finnmark, North Norway.

  • 25.
    Vårhammar, Annelie
    Högskolan i Halmstad, Akademin för ekonomi, teknik och naturvetenskap.
    Is there canine distemper virus in the Antarctic seal populations?2015Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The highly contagious canine distemper virus (CDV) has caused many so called epizootics, i.e. widespread transmissions of severe diseases in animal populations. Antibodies to CDV have been found several times in the northern hemisphere, but only once in the 1980’s in the phocid seal populations on the remote continent of Antarctica. This raises the question of whether the virus is enzootic or if it has been eliminated from the seal populations, which brings forth this study with serological testing on recently sampled seals. In this study, samples of 49 crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophagus), 49 Weddell seals (Leptonychotes weddellii) and 14 Ross seals (Ommatophoca rossii) from two separate expeditions with the Swedish icebreaker Oden in year 2008/2009 and 2010/2011 were tested for antibodies to CDV using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The ELISA was repeated three times on the same samples but unexpectedly showed inconsistent results. Statistical analysis revealed that there were significant differences in titre values between the three trials in all three species. The results must therefore be considered unreliable for the purpose of estimating antibody prevalence and should be discarded. The inconsistency could be explained by the ELISA kit being designed for dogs. Thus, the present study is valuable as a pilot study and shows that ELISA tests on seals developed for dogs should be treated with caution and that the samples need to be re-tested with other methods, preferably by using a virus neutralization test. The present study reviews the preceding literature concerning the prevalence of antibodies against CDV in the Antarctic seals, and also displays how the results of a future re-testing can be used to assess the susceptibility of a future outbreak of CDV in the seals of Antarctica.

1 - 25 of 25
CiteExportLink to result list
Permanent link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf