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  • 1.
    Barthelemy, Hélène
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Herbivores influence nutrient cycling and plant nutrient uptake: insights from tundra ecosystems2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Reindeer appear to have strong positive effects on plant productivity and nutrient cycling in strongly nutrient-limited ecosystems. While the direct effects of grazing on vegetation composition have been intensively studied, much less is known about the indirect effect of grazing on plant-soil interactions. This thesis investigated the indirect effects of ungulate grazing on arctic plant communities via soil nutrient availability and plant nutrient uptake.

    At high density, the deposition of dung alone increased plant productivity both in nutrient rich and nutrient poor tundra habitats without causing major changes in soil possesses. Plant community responses to dung addition was slow, with a delay of at least some years. By contrast, a 15N-urea tracer study revealed that nutrients from reindeer urine could be rapidly incorporated into arctic plant tissues. Soil and microbial N pools only sequestered small proportions of the tracer. This thesis therefore suggests a strong effect of dung and urine on plant productivity by directly providing nutrient-rich resources, rather than by stimulating soil microbial activities, N mineralization and ultimately increasing soil nutrient availability. Further, defoliation alone did not induce compensatory growth, but resulted in plants with higher nutrient contents. This grazing-induced increase in plant quality could drive the high N cycling in arctic secondary grasslands by providing litter of a better quality to the belowground system and thus increase organic matter decomposition and enhance soil nutrient availability. Finally, a 15N natural abundance study revealed that intense reindeer grazing influences how plants are taking up their nutrients and thus decreased plant N partitioning among coexisting plant species.

    Taken together these results demonstrate the central role of dung and urine and grazing-induced changes in plant quality for plant productivity. Soil nutrient concentrations alone do not reveal nutrient availability for plants since reindeer have a strong influence on how plants are taking up their nutrients. This thesis highlights that both direct and indirect effects of reindeer grazing are strong determinants of tundra ecosystem functioning. Therefore, their complex influence on the aboveground and belowground linkages should be integrated in future work on tundra ecosystem N dynamic.

  • 2.
    Björk, Robert G.
    et al.
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Majdi, Hooshang
    Department of Ecology, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Uppsala, Sweden.
    Klemedtsson, Leif
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Lewis-Johnsson, Lotta
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Molau, Ulf
    Department of Plant and Environmental Sciences, Göteborg University, Gothenburg, Sweden.
    Long-term warming effects on root morphology, root mass distribution, and microbial activity in two dry tundra plant communities in northern Sweden2007In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 176, no 4, p. 862-873Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    • Effects of warming on root morphology, root mass distribution and microbialactivity were studied in organic and mineral soil layers in two alpine ecosystems over > 10 yr, using open-top chambers, in Swedish Lapland.

    • Root mass was estimated using soil cores. Washed roots were scanned and sortedinto four diameter classes, for which variables including root mass (g dry matter(g DM) m –2 ), root length density (RLD; cm cm –3 soil), specific root length (SRL; m gDM –1 ), specific root area (SRA; m 2 kg DM –1 ), and number of root tips m –2 weredetermined. Nitrification (NEA) and denitrification enzyme activity (DEA) in the top10 cm of soil were measured.

    • Soil warming shifted the rooting zone towards the upper soil organic layer in bothplant communities. In the dry heath, warming increased SRL and SRA of the finestroots in both soil layers, whereas the dry meadow was unaffected. Neither NEA norDEA exhibited differences attributable to warming.

    • Tundra plants may respond to climate change by altering their root morphologyand mass while microbial activity may be unaffected. This suggests that carbon maybe incorporated in tundra soils partly as a result of increases in the mass of the finerroots if temperatures rise.

  • 3.
    Blume-Werry, Gesche
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    The hidden life of plants: fine root dynamics in northern ecosystems2016Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Fine roots constitute a large part of the primary production in northern (arctic and boreal) ecosystems, and are key players in ecosystem fluxes of water, nutrients and carbon. Data on root dynamics are generally rare, especially so in northern ecosystems. However, those ecosystems undergo the most rapid climatic changes on the planet and a profound understanding of form, function and dynamics of roots in such ecosystems is essential.

    This thesis aimed to advance our knowledge about fine root dynamics in northern ecosystems, with a focus on fine root phenology in natural plant communities and how climate change might alter it. Factors considered included thickness and duration of snow cover, thawing of permafrost, as well as natural gradients in temperature. Experiments and observational studies were located around Abisko (68°21' N, 18°45' E), and in a boreal forest close to Vindeln (64°14'N, 19°46'E), northern Sweden. Root responses included root growth, total root length, and root litter input, always involving seasonal changes therein, measured with minirhizotrons. Root biomass was also determined with destructive soil sampling. Additionally, aboveground response parameters, such as phenology and growth, and environmental parameters, such as air and soil temperatures, were assessed.

    This thesis reveals that aboveground patterns or responses cannot be directly translated belowground and urges a decoupling of above- and belowground phenology in terrestrial biosphere models. Specifically, root growth occurred outside of the photosynthetically active period of tundra plants. Moreover, patterns observed in arctic and boreal ecosystems diverged from those of temperate systems, and models including root parameters may thus need specific parameterization for northern ecosystems. In addition, this thesis showed that plant communities differ in root properties, and that changes in plant community compositions can thus induce changes in root dynamics and functioning. This underlines the importance of a thorough understanding of root dynamics in different plant community types in order to understand and predict how changes in plant communities in response to climate change will translate into root dynamics. Overall, this thesis describes root dynamics in response to a variety of factors, because a deeper knowledge about root dynamics will enable a better understanding of ecosystem processes, as well as improve model prediction of how northern ecosystems will respond to climate change.

  • 4.
    Blume-Werry, Gesche
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Lindén, Elin
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Andresen, Lisa
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Classen, Aimée T.
    Sanders, Nathan J.
    von Oppen, Jonathan
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Sundqvist, Maja K.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Proportion of fine roots, but not plant biomass allocation below ground, increases with elevation in arctic tundra2018In: Journal of Vegetation Science, ISSN 1100-9233, E-ISSN 1654-1103, Vol. 29, no 2, p. 226-235Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Questions: Roots represent a considerable proportion of biomass, primary production and litter input in arctic tundra, and plant allocation of biomass to above- or below-ground tissue in response to climate change is a key factor in the future C balance of these ecosystems. According to optimality theory plants allocate C to the above- or below-ground structure that captures the most limiting resource. We used an elevational gradient to test this theory and as a space-for-time substitution to inform on tundra carbon allocation patterns under a shifting climate, by exploring if increasing elevation was positively related to the root:shoot ratio, as well as a larger plant allocation to adsorptive over storage roots.

    Location: Arctic tundra heath dominated by Empetrum hermaphroditum close to Abisko, Sweden.

    Methods: We measured root:shoot and fine:coarse root ratios of the plant communities along an elevational gradient by sampling above- and below-ground biomass, further separating root biomass into fine (<1 mm) and coarse roots.

    Results: Plant biomass was higher at the lower elevations, but the root:shoot ratio did not vary with elevation. Resource allocation to fine relative to coarse roots increased with elevation, resulting in a fine:coarse root ratio that more than doubled with increasing elevation.

    Conclusions: Contrary to previous works, the root:shoot ratio along this elevational gradient remained stable. However, communities along our study system were dominated by the same species at each elevation, which suggests that when changes in the root:shoot ratio occur with elevation these changes may be driven by differences in allocation patterns among species and thus turnover in plant community structure. Our results further reveal that the allocation of biomass to fine relative to coarse roots can differ between locations along an elevational gradient, even when overall above- vs below-ground biomass allocation does not. Given the functionally different roles of fine vs coarse roots this could have large implications for below-ground C cycling. Our results highlight the importance of direct effects vs indirect effects (such as changes in plant community composition and nutrient availability) of climate change for future C allocation above and below ground.

  • 5.
    Blume-Werry, Gesche
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Wilson, Scott D.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Kreyling, Juergen
    Milbau, Ann
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    The hidden season: growing season is 50% longer below than above ground along an arctic elevation gradient2016In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 209, no 3, p. 978-986Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    There is compelling evidence from experiments and observations that climate warming prolongs the growing season in arctic regions. Until now, the start, peak, and end of the growing season, which are used to model influences of vegetation on biogeochemical cycles, were commonly quantified using above-ground phenological data. Yet, over 80% of the plant biomass in arctic regions can be below ground, and the timing of root growth affects biogeochemical processes by influencing plant water and nutrient uptake, soil carbon input and microbial activity. We measured timing of above- and below-ground production in three plant communities along an arctic elevation gradient over two growing seasons. Below-ground production peaked later in the season and was more temporally uniform than above-ground production. Most importantly, the growing season continued c. 50% longer below than above ground. Our results strongly suggest that traditional above-ground estimates of phenology in arctic regions, including remotely sensed information, are not as complete a representation of whole-plant production intensity or duration, as studies that include root phenology. We therefore argue for explicit consideration of root phenology in studies of carbon and nutrient cycling, in terrestrial biosphere models, and scenarios of how arctic ecosystems will respond to climate warming.

  • 6. Blåhed, Ida-Maria
    et al.
    Königsson, Helena
    Ericsson, Göran
    Spong, Göran
    Discovery of SNPs for individual identification by reduced representation sequencing of moose (Alces alces)2018In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 13, no 5, p. 1-14, article id e0197364Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Monitoring of wild animal populations is challenging, yet reliable information about population processes is important for both management and conservation efforts. Access to molecular markers, such as SNPs, enables population monitoring through genotyping of various DNA sources. We have developed 96 high quality SNP markers for individual identification of moose (Alces alces), an economically and ecologically important top-herbivore in boreal regions. Reduced representation libraries constructed from 34 moose were high-throughput de novo sequenced, generating nearly 50 million read pairs. About 50 000 stacks of aligned reads containing one or more SNPs were discovered with the Stacks pipeline. Several quality criteria were applied on the candidate SNPs to find markers informative on the individual level and well representative for the population. An empirical validation by genotyping of sequenced individuals and additional moose, resulted in the selection of a final panel of 86 high quality autosomal SNPs. Additionally, five sex-specific SNPs and five SNPs for sympatric species diagnostics are included in the panel. The genotyping error rate was 0.002 for the total panel and probability of identities were low enough to separate individuals with high confidence. Moreover, the autosomal SNPs were highly informative also for population level analyses. The potential applications of this SNP panel are thus many including investigations of population size, sex ratios, relatedness, reproductive success and population structure. Ideally, SNP-based studies could improve today’s population monitoring and increase our knowledge about moose population dynamics.

  • 7.
    Borg, Christina
    Uppsala universitet, Institutionen för ekologi och evolution.
    Structural Growth in Mountain Birch, Betula pubescens ssp. czerepanovii2005Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    In this thesis, I have studied long shoot performance in the monoecious, deciduous tree Betula pubescens ssp. czerepanovii. In field studies and a common garden experiment, I have a) studied how environmental variations affect the performance of long shoots in mountain birch, and b) described the relationship between long shoot performance and characteristics of the parent long shoot.

    I have shown that difference in long shoot performance to some extent can be explained by environmental variables such as temperature, precipitation and global radiation the current and previous summer, annual soil and air temperatures, and the length of growing season. For example, a low summer temperature the previous summer had a negative effect on a majority of long shoot characteristics. Variation in shoot characteristics was of the same magnitude along the regional east-western gradient as along the local altitudinal gradient. Variation among individual trees was of the same magnitude as variation among years. Further, long shoot performance was affected by the parent shoot characteristics and reflects that primordia of different organs are formed in the previous summer.

    On several occasions, freezing damage to mountain birch has been observed on Mt Njulla in northernmost Sweden. Following such damage, fewer but larger leaves emerge. Damages were compensated for with increased number of buds on long shoots produced the same year and one year after damage. Moreover, there were more new long shoots born on short shoots among damaged trees. Dormant buds and short shoots fulfil important functions in a fluctuating environment and as an adaptation to recurring damages of different origin and severity.

    Differences in the performance among mountain birch saplings grown in a common-garden at Abisko could to a large degree be explained by their origin. Further, saplings from Sweden and from Iceland responded differently to defoliation, and fertilization did not alter the responses to defoliation.

  • 8.
    Breitling, Rainer
    et al.
    Faculty of Life Sciences, University of Manchester, UK.
    Buckland, Philip I.
    Umeå universitet, Miljöarkeologiska laboratoriet.
    Epigean spiders at Abisko Scientific Research Station in Swedish Lapland (Arachnida:Araneae)2015In: The Bulletin of the British Arachnological Society, ISSN 0524-4994, Vol. 16, no 8, p. 287-293Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The Torneträsk area, including the Abisko National Park, Sweden, is arachnologically one of the best explored sites of Fennoscandia. Here we report the results of pitfall trapping at Abisko Scientific Research Station during the summers of 2004 and 2005, recording 791 individuals of 62 species of spiders. As expected, at the species level, samples were dominated by members of the Linyphiidae, while at the level of individuals Pardosa hyperborea and other lycosids were dominant. Two subsites, on heath and bog, differed substantially in their species profile: 7 species were statistically overrepresented on the drier heath site, while 2 species showed a strong preference for the wetter bog site. The samples also contained the first reported lateral gynadromorph of Archaeodictyna consecuta (Dictynidae). This study, from 195 km north of the Arctic Circle, provides important reference data for continued studies on the long-term effects of climate change on arctic ecosystems.

  • 9. De Long, Jonathan R.
    et al.
    Sundqvist, Maja K.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Gundale, Michael J.
    Giesler, Reiner
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Wardle, David A.
    Effects of elevation and nitrogen and phosphorus fertilization on plant defence compounds in subarctic tundra heath vegetation2016In: Functional Ecology, ISSN 0269-8463, E-ISSN 1365-2435, Vol. 30, no 2, p. 314-325Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Plant chemical and structural defence compounds are well known to impact upon herbivory of fresh leaves and influence decomposition rates after leaf senescence. A number of theories predict that alleviating nutrient limitation and reducing other environmental stressors will result in decreased production of plant chemical defences. In this study, we measured plant defence properties [total polyphenols (TP), condensed tannins (CT) and lignin concentrations, and protein complexation capacity (PCC)] in both fresh and senesced plant leaves in a fully factorial N and P fertilization experiment set-up at each of three elevations along an elevational gradient in Swedish subarctic tundra heath vegetation. Further, we performed a decomposition of variance analysis on community-weighted averages (CWAs) of plant defence properties to determine the relative contributions of interspecific and intraspecific variation to the total variation observed in response to elevation and nutrient addition. We hypothesized that N fertilization would reduce plant defence properties and that this reduction would be greater at higher elevations, while the effects of P fertilization would have no effect at any elevation. At the community level, N addition reduced CT and PCC in both fresh and senesced leaves and TP in senesced leaves, while P addition had few effects, broadly in line with our hypothesis. The effects of N addition frequently varied with elevation, but in contrast to our hypothesis, the said effects were strongest at the lowest elevations. The effects of N addition and the interactive effect of N with elevation were primarily driven by intraspecific, rather than interspecific, variation. Our findings suggest that as temperatures warm and N availability increases due to global climate change, secondary metabolites in subarctic heath vegetation will decline particularly within species. Our results highlight the need to consider the effects of both nutrient availability and temperature, and their interaction, in driving subarctic plant defence.

  • 10.
    de Miranda, Joachim R.
    et al.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Hedman, Harald
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Onorati, Piero
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Stephan, Jorg
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Karlberg, Olof
    Uppsala universitet, Molekylär medicin.
    Bylund, Helena
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Ecol, S-75007 Uppsala, Sweden..
    Terenius, Olle
    Uppsala universitet, Mikrobiologi.
    Characterization of a Novel RNA Virus Discovered in the Autumnal Moth Epirrita autumnata in Sweden2017In: Viruses, ISSN 1999-4915, E-ISSN 1999-4915, Vol. 9, no 8, article id 214Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A novel, 10 kb RNA virus-tentatively named 'Abisko virus'-was discovered in the transcriptome data of a diseased autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata) larva, as part of a search for the possible causes of the cyclical nature and mortality associated with geometrid moth dynamics and outbreaks in northern Fennoscandia. Abisko virus has a genome organization similar to that of the insect-infecting negeviruses, but phylogenetic and compositional bias analyses also reveal strong affiliations with plant-infecting viruses, such that both the primary host origin and taxonomic identity of the virus remain in doubt. In an extensive set of larval, pupal, and adult autumnal moth and winter moth (Operophtera brumata) outbreak samples, the virus was only detected in a few adult E. autumnata moths as well as the single larval transcriptome. The Abisko virus is therefore unlikely to be a factor in the Fennoscandia geometrid population dynamics.

  • 11. Fernández-Gómez, Beatriz
    et al.
    Díez, Beatriz
    Polz, Martin F.
    Ignacio Arroyo, José
    Alfaro, Fernando D.
    Marchandon, Germán
    Sanhueza, Cynthia
    Farías, Laura
    Trefault, Nicole
    Marquet, Pablo A.
    Molina-Montenegro, Marco A.
    Sylvander, Peter
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Snoeijs-Leijonmalm, Pauline
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och botanik.
    Bacterial community structure in a sympagic habitat expanding with global warming: brackish ice brine at 85-90 degrees N2019In: The ISME Journal, ISSN 1751-7362, E-ISSN 1751-7370, Vol. 13, no 2, p. 316-333Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Larger volumes of sea ice have been thawing in the Central Arctic Ocean (CAO) during the last decades than during the past 800,000 years. Brackish brine (fed by meltwater inside the ice) is an expanding sympagic habitat in summer all over the CAO. We report for the first time the structure of bacterial communities in this brine. They are composed of psychrophilic extremophiles, many of them related to phylotypes known from Arctic and Antarctic regions. Community structure displayed strong habitat segregation between brackish ice brine (IB; salinity 2.4-9.6) and immediate sub-ice seawater (SW; salinity 33.3-34.9), expressed at all taxonomic levels (class to genus), by dominant phylotypes as well as by the rare biosphere, and with specialists dominating IB and generalists SW. The dominant phylotypes in IB were related to Candidatus Aquiluna and Flavobacterium, those in SW to Balneatrix and ZD0405, and those shared between the habitats to Halomonas, Polaribacter and Shewanella. A meta-analysis for the oligotrophic CAO showed a pattern with Flavobacteriia dominating in melt ponds, Flavobacteriia and Gammaproteobacteria in solid ice cores, Flavobacteriia, Gamma- and Betaproteobacteria, and Actinobacteria in brine, and Alphaproteobacteria in SW. Based on our results, we expect that the roles of Actinobacteria and Betaproteobacteria in the CAO will increase with global warming owing to the increased production of meltwater in summer. IB contained three times more phylotypes than SW and may act as an insurance reservoir for bacterial diversity that can act as a recruitment base when environmental conditions change.

  • 12.
    Hedlund, Johanna
    Stockholms universitet, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Climate change effects on migratory birds and on the ecology and behaviour of the willow warbler (Phylloscopus trochilus)2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Recent global climate change is influencing the behaviour and ecology of species worldwide. Birds are typical systems to study in this context, as they are often migratory and thus subjected to a variety of environmental effects. This thesis employs the use of long-term ringing records, field observations, historical maps and historical volunteer observations with the aim of describing behavioural and ecological responses of birds to the current environmental change. An investigation into the spring arrival, reproduction and autumn departure in willow warblers (Phylloscopus trochilus) breeding at a southern study site in Sweden (65°N 18°E) showed that all three phenological events had advanced in parallel. Thus birds arrive earlier, start breeding earlier and leave Sweden earlier, with the breeding period staying the same in length. By teasing apart the migratory responses of different individuals, it became clear that particularly early arriving males and early departing juveniles had advanced migration. However, willow warblers migrating past a northern study site in Sweden (65°N 23°E) displayed no change in autumn departure. When migration in the two regionally separate populations were analyzed in relation to climatic variables, the results indicated that foremost a combined effect of growing season onset and the North Atlantic Oscillation influenced migratory timing, and only in individuals that had advanced migration. As growing season onset had advanced at both regions, but only elicited migratory change in southern willow warblers, it is proposed that intra-specific difference between populations prepare them differently to climate change. Willow warblers breeding at northern latitudes were also displaying absence of an otherwise common behaviour of the species: philopatry. It is suggested that the climate induced change in onset of the growing season, coupled with an increase in available territories, could have enabled a southern influx of dispersal-prone birds adopting a less philopatric breeding behaviour. Availability of territories was also studied in southern Sweden, in relation to 100 years of land use change and future climate change effects on forestry. The mass-conversion of grazed forest into coniferous sylvicultures that has occurred in Sweden 1900-2013 was shown to have negatively affected territory availability for willow warblers. The second most common bird species in Sweden, the chaffinch (Fringilla coelebs), was however shown to be largely unaffected. In a future scenario where rising temperatures will increase growth rates of trees, harvest rotation will be faster and both sylvicultures and logged areas will increase in coverage, favouring both species. Thus commonness in terms of landscape and species occurrence has altered historically and is dynamically linked. Historic perspectives were also applied to observations of spring arrival of 14 migratory bird species. A relative comparison of two data sets, collected over 140 years, revealed that short-distance migrants have changed their spring arrival more than long-distance migrants in southern Sweden. In conclusion, the results of this thesis provide insights into climate change effects on avian behaviour and ecology, document unique observations and contribute with a great spectrum of knowledge, from exact details on responses by individual birds, through long-term changes in populations to historical perspectives on shifts in entire landscapes

  • 13.
    Hedlund, Johanna S. U.
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Sjösten, Frida
    Sokolovskis, Kristaps
    Jakobsson, Sven
    Stockholms universitet, Zoologiska institutionen.
    Point of no return – absence of returning birds in the otherwise philopatric willow warbler Phylloscopus trochilus2017In: Journal of Avian Biology, ISSN 0908-8857, E-ISSN 1600-048XArticle in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The return of individual birds to a specific area in successional years, i.e. philopatry, is a remarkable behavioural trait. Here we report on the remarkably reversed: the complete absence of returning individuals of a migratory passerine with otherwise pronounced philopatry. At a high latitude study site in Abisko (68°32ʹN, 18°80ʹE) in northern Sweden none of the banded adult willow warblers Phylloscopus trochilus returned to breed 2011–2014. This is in stark contrast to all other reports in the literature and also to our two southern study sites (at 56°56ʹN, 18°10ʹE and at 58°94ʹN, 17°14ʹE) where 18–38% of adults returned. We investigated this aberrant pattern found in Abisko by analysing three parameters known to influence philopatry; nest predation, breeding success and breeding density, and predicted that absence of philopatry should co-occur with low breeding success, low breeding density and/or high nest predation. The results did not corroborate this, except that breeding density was lower at Abisko (49–71 pairs km–2) than at the southern sites (106 pairs km–2, 101 pairs km–2). Instead, we suggest the hypothesis that the absence of philopatry is caused by an influx of southern, dispersal-prone individuals deploying another breeding strategy and that this intra-specific range expansion is enabled by milder climate and low population density.

  • 14.
    Hein, Catherine L.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Öhlund, Gunnar
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Englund, Göran
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Fish introductions reveal the temperature dependence of species interactions2014In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 281, no 1775, p. 20132641-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    A major area of current research is to understand how climate change will impact species interactions and ultimately biodiversity. A variety of environmental conditions are rapidly changing owing to climate warming, and these conditions often affect both the strength and outcome of species interactions. We used fish distributions and replicated fish introductions to investigate environmental conditions influencing the coexistence of two fishes in Swedish lakes: brown trout (Salmo trutta) and pike (Esox lucius). A logistic regression model of brown trout and pike coexistence showed that these species coexist in large lakes (more than 4.5 km(2)), but not in small, warm lakes (annual air temperature more than 0.9-1.5 degrees C). We then explored how climate change will alter coexistence by substituting climate scenarios for 2091-2100 into our model. The model predicts that brown trout will be extirpated from approximately half of the lakes where they presently coexist with pike and from nearly all 9100 lakes where pike are predicted to invade. Context dependency was critical for understanding pike-brown trout interactions, and, given the widespread occurrence of context-dependent species interactions, this aspect will probably be critical for accurately predicting climate impacts on biodiversity.

  • 15.
    Hylander, Samuel
    et al.
    Linnéuniversitetet, Institutionen för biologi och miljö (BOM).
    Hansson, Lars-Anders
    Unds universitet.
    Vertical distribution and pigmentation of Antarctic zooplankton determined by a blend of UV radiation, predation and food availability2013In: Aquatic Ecology, ISSN 1386-2588, E-ISSN 1573-5125, Vol. 47, no 4, p. 467-480Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Selection pressure induced by simultaneously occurring environmental threats is a major evolutionary driver for organisms in terrestrial, as well as in aquatic ecosystems. For example, protection against ultraviolet radiation (UVR) and predation include both morphological and behavioral components. Here we address those selective pressures on zooplankton by performing a latitudinal monitoring, combined with mechanistic experiments in the Antarctic Southern Ocean, where the UVR-threat is extremely high. We assessed vertical distributions of zooplankton along the Antarctic coast showing that animals were most abundant at 20-80 m and tended to avoid the surface at sites with clear water. UVR-threat disappeared at between 9 and 15 m at sites with low and high water transparency, respectively. Light levels were, however, sufficient for visual fish predation down to approximately 19 and 37 m, respectively. The few zooplankton that were present in surface waters had high levels of non-pigmented UVR-protective compounds (mycosporine-like amino acids) compared to deeper dwelling zooplankton. Overall they had low levels of red pigmented UVR-protective compounds (carotenoids), suggesting high predation on pigmented individuals. In a complementary laboratory study we showed that levels of UVR-protective compounds increased considerably when zooplankton were exposed to UVR in the absence of predator cues. The recently developed transparency-regulator hypothesis predicts that UVR avoidance is an important driver to diel vertical migration in transparent waters, such as in Antarctica. We, however, conclude that copepods resided well below the level where UVR had diminished to very low levels and that predator avoidance or food availability are more likely drivers of zooplankton vertical depth distribution in transparent marine systems.

  • 16.
    Jelk, Caroline
    Karlstads universitet, Institutionen för miljö- och livsvetenskaper.
    Skillnader i inomartsvariation i morfologiska karaktärer av Empetrum hermaphroditum mellan habitat2017Independent thesis Basic level (degree of Bachelor), 10 credits / 15 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    This study is based on data of a previous study investigating whether snow depth affects average growth and reproduction of Empetrum hermaphroditum over a latitudinal and climatic gradient (Bienau et al. 2014). I tested the effects region and snow depth on intraspecific variation of growth-related variables instead, to clarify whether the species has the potential to cope with changes in snow depth and increased growing season in the future. Earlier research results led to the hypothesis that intraspecific variation depends on resources in the habitat and raises the question of whether there is higher variation in Empetrum in favorable habitats such as birch forests and habitats with deep snow cover than in adverse habitats such as those with a shallow snow cover. My analyses suggest that there were significant differences in variability between habitats in some morphological characters. However, not all of these characters follow the expected pattern that the favorable habitats would have a greater variety. Overall, significant differences were found in variation in the length of the main and the lateral shoots, leaf vitality on the main shoots and the dry weight of the stem. These results imply that the above hypothesis is correct for some growth-related variables. 

  • 17.
    Jochum, Till
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Germination and Seedling Establishment of Arctic and Boreal Species and the Importance of Disturbance for sucessful Recruitment under simulated Summer Warming2008Student paper other, 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
  • 18.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K
    et al.
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Lindblad, Karin E M
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Björk, Robert G
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Alatalo, Juha M
    Vinnova.
    Molau, Ulf
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Bryophyte and lichen diversity under simulated environmental change compared with observed variation in unmanipulated alpine tundra2006In: Biodiversity and Conservation, ISSN 0960-3115, E-ISSN 1572-9710, Vol. 15, no 14, p. 4453-4475Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Effects of simulated environmental change on bryophyte and lichen species richness and diversity in alpine tundra were investigated in a 5-year experiment at Latnjajaure, northern Sweden. The experiment had a factorial design including fertilisation and temperature enhancement in one meadow and one heath plant community. Responses in species richness, biodiversity, and species composition of bryophytes and lichens to experimental treatments were compared to the observed variation in six naturally occurring plant communities. The combination of fertilisation and enhanced temperature resulted in a species impoverishment, for bryophytes in the bryophyte-dominated community, and for lichens in the lichen-dominated communities, but the species composition stayed within the observed natural variation. During the course of the study, no species new to the investigated mid-alpine landscape were recorded, but that scenario is realistic within a decade when comparing with the processes seen in vascular plants.

  • 19.
    Jägerbrand, Annika K
    et al.
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Molau, Ulf
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Alatalo, Juha M
    Göteborgs Universitet.
    Responses of bryophytes to simulated environmental change at Latnjajaure, northern Sweden2003In: Journal of Bryology, ISSN 0373-6687, E-ISSN 1743-2820, Vol. 25, no 3, p. 163-168Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We simulated a predicted environmental change in a subarctic-alpine plant community to study short-term growth in Hylocomium splendens, and three-year effects in abundance changes of the five most common bryophytes at Latnjajaure, northern Sweden. The experiment had a factorial design with increased temperature and nutrients, alone and in combination. Moss growth was measured during the 1995 growing season, and we measured species abundance before and after three years of environmental perturbation. The combined treatments of fertilizer and temperature enhancement caused a decreased growth in length and dry weight in H. splendens. There was a significant decrease in abundance of Rhytidium rugosum in the combined temperature and fertilizer treatment. The other four common bryophyte species (Aulacomnium turgidum, Dicranum groenlandicum, Hylocomium splendens, and Ptilidium ciliare) showed weaker, but not significant trends in the same direction. As the bryophytes are an important component of arctic and subarctic vegetation, we expect that they will play a key role in the impact of anticipated Global Change on the ecosystems.

  • 20. Lehnert, K.
    et al.
    Weirup, L.
    Harding, K. C.
    Harkonen, T.
    Karisson, O.
    Teilmann, J.
    Antarctic seals: Molecular biomarkers as indicators for pollutant exposure, health effects and diet2017In: Science of the Total Environment, ISSN 0048-9697, E-ISSN 1879-1026, Vol. 599, p. 1693-1704Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Weddell (Leptonychotes weddellii), Ross (Ommatophoca rossii) and crabeater seals (Lobodon carcinophaga) are phocid seals with a circumpolar distribution around Antarctica. As long-lived and large top predators, they bioaccumulate contaminants and are considered as sentinels of ecosystem health. Antarctic seals are increasingly exposed to climate change, pollution, shipping and fisheries. To reveal and understand possible anthropogenic impacts on their immune and health status, this study investigates sensitive biomarkers of the xenobiotic metabolism and immune system in relation to mercury (Hg) burden. Gene-transcription studies using minimally invasive blood samples are useful to monitor physiological processes in wildlife that can be related to different stressors. Blood samples of 72 wild-caught seals (Weddell n = 33; Ross n = 12; crabeater n = 27) in the Amundsen and Ross Seas in 2008-2011 were investigated. Copy numbers per mu l mRNA transcription of xenobiotic biomarkers (aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR)), aryl hydrocarbon receptor nuclear translocator (ARNT) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR alpha) and immune relevant cell mediators (cytokines interleukin-2 (IL-2), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and heat-shock-protein 70 (HSP70)) were measured using reference genes Tyrosine 3-monooxygenase/tryptophan 5-monooxygenase activation protein, zeta polypeptide (YWHAZ) and ribosomal protein L4 (RPL4) by real time RT-qPCR. Hg concentration was analysed in fur. Hg concentration increased with body weight and standard length in all species. Crabeater seals showed a lower Hg concentration than Ross and Weddell seals. Species-specific differences in gene-transcription were found between all species with highest levels of AHR, ARNT and PPARa in crabeater seals. Ross seals showed highest IL-10 and HSP70 transcription, while HSP70 was exceptionally low in crabeater seals. Between Hg and HSP70 a clear negative relationship was found in all species. The species-specific, age and sex-dependent gene-transcription probably reflect dietary habits, pollutant exposure and immune status. (C) 2017 Published by Elsevier B.V.

  • 21.
    Lett, Signe
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Mosses as mediators of climate change: implications for tree seedling establishment in the tundra2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Alpine and arctic tree line expansion depends on the establishment of tree seedlings above the current tree line, which is expected to occur with climate warming. However, tree lines often fail to respond to higher temperatures. Other environmental factors are therefore likely important for tree seedling establishment. Above the tree line, establishing seedlings encounter existing vegetation such as bryophytes, which often dominate in arctic and alpine tundra. Bryophytes modify their environment in various ways and may mediate climate change effects on establishing tree seedlings, and with that tree line expansion. The aim of this thesis was to understand if and how the environment, in particular bryophytes, mediates the impact of climate change on tree seedling establishment at the alpine and arctic tree line. This was explored by reviewing literature on tree seedling establishment at alpine and arctic tree lines globally. In addition, tree seedling survival and growth of Betula pubescens and Pinus sylvestris were assessed experimentally. Here, individuals were planted into mono-specific mats of different bryophytes species and exposed to warming and different precipitation regimes. The literature review revealed that besides from temperature, tree seedling establishment is affected by a wide range of abiotic and biotic factors including water, snow, nutrients, light, disturbance and surrounding vegetation. Furthermore the review revealed that for example vegetation can change tree seedling responses to climate change. The experiments showed that especially tree seedling survival was adversely affected by the presence of bryophytes and that the impacts of bryophytes were larger than those of the climate treatments. Seedling growth, on the other hand, was not hampered by the presence of bryophytes, which is in line with earlier findings that seedling survival, growth and seed germination do not respond similarly to changes in environmental conditions. Moreover, we found several indications that vegetation above the tree line, including bryophytes, mediated tree seedling responses to warming and precipitation or snow cover. This thesis shows that temperature alone should not be used to predict future tree seedling establishment above the alpine and arctic tree line and that extrapolations from climate envelope models could strongly over or under estimate tree line responses to warming. This underlines the value of multi-factorial studies for understanding the interplay between warming and other environmental factors and their effects on tree seedling establishment across current tree lines.

  • 22.
    Lett, Signe
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Nilsson, Marie-Charlotte
    Wardle, David
    Dorrepaal, Ellen
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Bryophyte traits explain climate-warming effects on tree seedling establishment2017In: Journal of Ecology, ISSN 0022-0477, E-ISSN 1365-2745, Vol. 105, no 2, p. 496-506Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Above the alpine tree line, bryophytes cover much of the tundra soil surface in dense, often monospecific carpets. Therefore, when climate warming enables tree seedling establishment above the tree line, interaction with the bryophyte layer is inevitable. Bryophytes are known to modify their environment in various ways. However, little is known about to which extent and by which mechanisms bryophytes affect the response of tree seedlings to climate warming.

    We aimed to assess and understand the importance of bryophyte species identity and traits for tree seedling performance at tree line temperatures and their response to warmer conditions. Seedlings of two common, tree line-forming tree species (Betula pubescens and Pinus sylvestris) were planted into intact cushions of eight common tundra bryophyte species and bryophyte-free soil and grown for 18 weeks at current (7·0 °C) and near-future (30–50 years; 9·2 °C) tree line average growing-season temperatures. Seedling performance (biomass increase and N-uptake) was measured and related to bryophyte species identity and traits indicative of their impact on the environment.

    Tree seedlings performed equally well or better in the presence of bryophytes than in bryophyte-free soil, which contrasts to their usually negative effects in milder climates. In addition, seedling performance and their response to higher temperatures depended on bryophyte species and seedlings of both species grew largest in the pan-boreal and subarctic bryophyte Hylocomium splendens. However, B. pubescens seedlings showed much stronger responses to higher temperatures when grown in bryophytes than in bryophyte-free soil, while the opposite was true for P. sylvestris seedlings. For B. pubescens, but not for P. sylvestris, available organic nitrogen of the bryophyte species was the trait that best predicted seedling responses to higher temperatures, likely because these seedlings had increased N-demands.

    Synthesis. Climatically driven changes in bryophyte species distribution may not only have knock-on effects on vascular plant establishment, but temperature effects on seedling performance are themselves moderated by bryophytes in a species-specific way. Bryophyte traits can serve as a useful tool for understanding and predicting these complex interactions.

  • 23. Martinet, Baptiste
    et al.
    Brasero, Nicolas
    Lecocq, Thomas
    Biella, Paolo
    Valterová, Irena
    Michez, Denis
    Rasmont, Pierre
    Adding attractive semio-chemical trait refines the taxonomy of Alpinobombus (Hymenoptera: Apidae)2018In: Apidologie, ISSN 0044-8435, E-ISSN 1297-9678, Vol. 49, no 6, p. 838-851Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Species taxonomy of bumblebees (Bombus Latreille, 1802) is well known to be problematic due to a potentially high intra-specific variability of morphological traits while different species can converge locally to the same color pattern (cryptic species). Assessing species delimitation remains challenging because it requires to arbitrarily select variable traits whose accuracy continues to be debated. Integrative taxonomic approach seems to be very useful for this group as different independent traits are assessed to propose a rational taxonomic hypothesis. Among operational criteria to assess specific status, the reproductive traits involved in the pre-mating recognition (i.e., the male cephalic labial gland secretions, CLGS) have been premium information. Since these secretions are supposed to be species-specific, these chemical traits can bring essential information where species delimitation is debated. Here, we describe and compare the CLGS of 161 male specimens of nine Alpinobombus taxa: alpinus, balteatus, helleri, hyperboreus, kirbiellus, natvigi, neoboreus, polaris, and pyrrhopygus. We aim also to test the congruence between this new information (reproductive traits) and published genetic dataset. Our results emphasized six distinct groups with diagnostic major compounds: (a) alpinus + helleri with hexadec-9-en-1-ol; (b) polaris + pyrrhopygus with two major compounds hexadec-9-en-1-ol and hexadec-9-enal; (c) balteatus with tetradecyl acetate; (d) kirbiellus with geranyl geranyl acetate; (e) hyperboreus + natvigi with octadec-11-en-1-ol; (f) neoboreus with octadec-9-en-1-ol. Based on this new information, we can confirm the species status of B. alpinus, B. balteatus, B. hyperboreus, B. kirbiellus, B. neoboreus, and B. polaris. We also confirm the synonymy of helleri (Alps) with alpinus (Sweden). However, the specific status of natvigi (Alaska) and pyrrhopygus (Sweden) is questionable and these taxa do not have specific CLGS composition.

  • 24.
    Mondav, Rhiannon
    The University of Queensland, Australia.
    Microbial dynamics in a thawing world: Microbial ecology of a permafrost active layer2014Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years))Student thesis
  • 25.
    Monteux, Sylvain
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    A song of ice and mud: Interactions of microbes with roots, fauna and carbon in warming permafrost-affected soils2018Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Permafrost-affected soils store a large quantity of soil organic matter (SOM) – ca. half of worldwide soil carbon – and currently undergo rapid and severe warming due to climate change. Increased SOM decomposition by microorganisms and soil fauna due to climate change, poses the risk of a positive climate feedback through the release of greenhouse gases. Direct effects of climate change on SOM decomposition, through such mechanisms as deepening of the seasonally-thawing active layer and increasing soil temperatures, have gathered considerable scientific attention in the last two decades. Yet, indirect effects mediated by changes in plant, microbial, and fauna communities, remain poorly understood. Microbial communities, which may be affected by climate change-induced changes in vegetation composition or rooting patterns, and may in turn affect SOM decomposition, are the primary focus of the work described in this thesis.

    We used (I) a field-scale permafrost thaw experiment in a palsa peatland, (II) a laboratory incubation of Yedoma permafrost with inoculation by exotic microorganisms, (III) a microcosm experiment with five plant species grown either in Sphagnum peat or in newly-thawed permafrost peat, and (IV) a field-scale cold season warming experiment in cryoturbated tundra to address the indirect effects of climate change on microbial drivers of SOM decomposition. Community composition data for bacteria and fungi were obtained by amplicon sequencing and phospholipid fatty acid extraction, and for collembola by Tullgren extraction, alongside measurements of soil chemistry, CO2 emissions and root density.

    We showed that in situ thawing of a palsa peatland caused colonization of permafrost soil by overlying soil microbes. Further, we observed that functional limitations of permafrost microbial communities can hamper microbial metabolism in vitro. Relieving these functional limitations in vitro increased cumulative CO2 emissions by 32% over 161 days and introduced nitrification. In addition, we found that different plant species did not harbour different rhizosphere bacterial communities in Sphagnum peat topsoil, but did when grown in newly-thawed permafrost peat. Plant species may thus differ in how they affect functional limitations in thawing permafrost soil. Therefore, climate change-induced changes in vegetation composition might alter functioning in the newly-thawed, subsoil permafrost layer of northern peatlands, but less likely so in the topsoil. Finally, we observed that vegetation encroachment in barren cryoturbated soil, due to reduced cryogenic activity with higher temperatures, change both bacterial and collembola community composition, which may in turn affect soil functioning.

    This thesis shows that microbial community dynamics and plant-decomposer interactions play an important role in the functioning of warming permafrost-affected soils. More specifically, it demonstrates that the effects of climate change on plants can trickle down on microbial communities, in turn affecting SOM decomposition in thawing permafrost.

  • 26.
    Niva, Mikael
    Uppsala universitet, Ekologisk botanik.
    Life History Strategies in Linnaea borealis2003Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    About 70% of the plant species in the temperate zone are characterised by clonal growth, clonal species are also in majority in the Arctic and Subarctic where they affect the structure and composition of the vegetation. It is therefore of great importance to increase our knowledge about clonal plants and their growth and life histories. I have investigated how ramets of the stoloniferous plant Linnaea borealis are affected by the naturally occurring variation in environmental factors, such as: light, nutrient and water availability. Moreover, I examined the seed set and how supplemental hand pollination affects seed set in L. borealis, and also investigated the significance of the apical meristem for shoot population fitness. All studies were performed under field conditions in northern Sweden in a Subarctic environment and most are experimental.

    The results show that nutrient resorption from senescing leaves is not significantly affecting the growth and nutrient pools of the ramet. This implies that the growth of L. borealis ramets is not governed by micro-site resource availability. However, removal of light competition resulted in increased branching and number of lateral meristems produced, reduced growth, and decreased root:shoot ratio on a per ramet basis. Thus, ramets of L. borealis can efficiently exploit favourable light patches through plastic growth. Apical dominance exerts a significant effect on shoot population fitness and can be lost through rodent grazing. However, loss of apical dominance is dependent on the timing of grazing, if the apical meristem is removed early in the autumn the ramet can repair the loss until the next summer. If grazing occur during spring the dry weight and leaf area production is affected negatively. Seed production in L. borealis in the Abisko area varies between years and sites, and was unaffected by supplemental hand pollination treatment, implying that there is no lack of pollinator activity.

  • 27.
    Niva, Mikael
    et al.
    Uppsala universitet, Ekologisk botanik.
    Svensson, Brita
    Uppsala universitet, Ekologisk botanik.
    Karlsson, P. Staffan
    Uppsala universitet, Ekologisk botanik.
    Effects of light and water availability on shoot dynamics of the stoloniferous Linnaea borealis2006In: Ecoscience, ISSN 1195-6860, Vol. 13, no 3, p. 318-323Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Many stoloniferous plant species have the ability to exploit resource-rich patches via plastic growth responses. The most efficient responses are shortened spacers and increased branching frequency. Here we experimentally investigate the ability of the stoloniferous plant Linnaea borealis to respond to patches of increased light intensity and reduced water availability in natural systems. The significance of contrasts between patches was also investigated. A three-level factorial design was used, with light, water availability, and site as the factors. Increased light intensity was achieved through mowing of the surrounding vegetation, and reduced water availability was achieved by placing wooden ledges under the stolons. The treatments were applied at three subarctic sites that differ in light conditions. Branching frequency, number of new meristems, average internode length, leaf area, and dry weight production were studied 14 months after the manipulations. Increased light intensity increased branching frequencies; the strongest effects were obtained at the site with a closed canopy. Average intemode length decreased 19% in response to increased light intensity. Root:shoot ratios decreased under increased light intensity and reduced water availability. A reduction in water availability alone did not affect any other investigated traits. We conclude that ramets of L. borealis are able to respond efficiently to small-scale variations in light intensity in natural systems, an ability of great importance for the performance of a prostrate species on shady forest floors.

  • 28. Olsrud, Maria
    et al.
    Carlsson, Bengt
    Svensson, Brita M.
    Uppsala universitet, Ekologisk botanik.
    Michelsen, Anders
    Melillo, Jerry M.
    Responses of fungal root colonization, plant cover and leaf nutrients to long-term exposure to elevated atmospheric CO2 and warming in a subarctic birch forest understory2010In: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. 16, no 6, p. 1820-1829Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Responses of the mycorrhizal fungal community in terrestrial ecosystems to global change factors are not well understood. However, virtually all land plants form symbiotic associations with mycorrhizal fungi, with approximately 20% of the plants' net primary production transported down to the fungal symbionts. In this study, we investigated how ericoid mycorrhiza (ErM), fine endophytes (FE) and dark septate endophytes (DSE) in roots responded to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations and warming in the dwarf shrub understory of a birch forest in the subarctic region of northern Sweden. To place the belowground results into an ecosystem context we also investigated how plant cover and nutrient concentrations in leaves responded to elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations and warming. The ErM colonization in ericaceous dwarf shrubs increased under elevated atmospheric CO2 concentrations, but did not respond to warming following 6 years of treatment. This suggests that the higher ErM colonization under elevated CO2 might be due to increased transport of carbon belowground to acquire limiting resources such as N, which was diluted in leaves of ericaceous plants under enhanced CO2. The elevated CO2 did not affect total plant cover but the plant cover was increased under warming, which might be due to increased N availability in soil. FE colonization in grass roots decreased under enhanced CO2 and under warming, which might be due to increased root growth, to which the FE fungi could not keep up, resulting in proportionally lower colonization. However, no responses in aboveground cover of Deschampsia flexuosa were seen. DSE hyphal colonization in grass roots significantly increased under warmer conditions, but did not respond to elevated CO2. This complex set of responses by mycorrhizal and other root-associated fungi to global change factors of all the fungal types studied could have broad implications for plant community structure and biogeochemistry of subarctic ecosystems.

  • 29. Ramirez, Kelly S.
    et al.
    Knight, Christopher G.
    de Hollander, Mattias
    Brearley, Francis Q.
    Constantinides, Bede
    Cotton, Anne
    Creer, Si
    Crowther, Thomas W.
    Davison, John
    Delgado-Baquerizo, Manuel
    Dorrepaal, Ellen
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Elliott, David R.
    Fox, Graeme
    Griffiths, Robert I.
    Hale, Chris
    Hartman, Kyle
    Houlden, Ashley
    Jones, David L.
    Krab, Eveline J.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Maestre, Fernando T.
    McGuire, Krista L.
    Monteux, Sylvain
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Orr, Caroline H.
    van der Putten, Wim H.
    Roberts, Ian S.
    Robinson, David A.
    Rocca, Jennifer D.
    Rowntree, Jennifer
    Schlaeppi, Klaus
    Shepherd, Matthew
    Singh, Brajesh K.
    Straathof, Angela L.
    Bhatnagar, Jennifer M.
    Thion, Cecile
    van der Heijden, Marcel G. A.
    de Vries, Franciska T.
    Detecting macroecological patterns in bacterial communities across independent studies of global soils2018In: Nature Microbiology, E-ISSN 2058-5276, Vol. 3, no 2, p. 189-196Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    The emergence of high-throughput DNA sequencing methods provides unprecedented opportunities to further unravel bacterial biodiversity and its worldwide role from human health to ecosystem functioning. However, despite the abundance of sequencing studies, combining data from multiple individual studies to address macroecological questions of bacterial diversity remains methodically challenging and plagued with biases. Here, using a machine-learning approach that accounts for differences among studies and complex interactions among taxa, we merge 30 independent bacterial data sets comprising 1,998 soil samples from 21 countries. Whereas previous meta-analysis efforts have focused on bacterial diversity measures or abundances of major taxa, we show that disparate amplicon sequence data can be combined at the taxonomy-based level to assess bacterial community structure. We find that rarer taxa are more important for structuring soil communities than abundant taxa, and that these rarer taxa are better predictors of community structure than environmental factors, which are often confounded across studies. We conclude that combining data from independent studies can be used to explore bacterial community dynamics, identify potential 'indicator' taxa with an important role in structuring communities, and propose hypotheses on the factors that shape bacterial biogeography that have been overlooked in the past.

  • 30.
    Richert, Inga
    et al.
    Department of Environmental Microbiology, Helmholtz Centre for Environmental Research – UFZ, Microbial Ecosystem Services Group, Leipzig, Germany.
    Dinasquet, Julie
    Logares, Ramiro
    Riemann, Lasse
    Wendeberg, Annelie
    Bertilsson, Stefan
    Science for Life Laboratory Uppsala, Sweden.
    The impact of light and water mass on bacterial population dynamics in the Amundsen Sea PolynyaManuscript (preprint) (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Although the Antarctic Ocean is perpetually cold, mostly ice-covered and dark, it is a highly productive and diverse marine ecosystem. During austral summer, ice-free patches (polynyas) form, exposing marine organisms to sunlight, while mobilizing large amounts of nutrients from the melting ice. As a result, intense phytoplankton blooms form that sustain life across the entire Antarctic food web. This seasonality is likely to shape microbial communities, but the main environmental drivers controlling these communities and the biogeochemical processes they mediate are largely unknown.

    In this study, the remote Amundsen Sea Polynya (ASP) was used as a model system to identify the influence of some of the most important environmental drivers of the Southern Ocean. We studied the dynamics in occurrence and activity of abundant members of the bacterioplankton community, directly in environmental samples as well as in microcosm experiments, by using next-generation sequencing of bar-coded 16S rRNA genes in combination with immunochemical detection of DNA-synthesis using bromodeoxyuridine as a tracer.

    We found that the photic zone harbored a bacterioplankton community with a low species richness. Here, the dominant populations were related to taxa known to benefit from high organic carbon and nutrient loads (copiotrophs). In contrast, the dark water masses below the photic zone hosted bacterial communities of higher richness, and were dominated by oligotrophs. Results from enrichment studies suggested that indirect impacts of light via photosynthetic production and competition for dissolved nutrients provided in the water masses are the two main factors shaping bacterial communities of the ASP.

  • 31. Rodriguez, Patricia
    et al.
    Ask, Jenny
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Hein, Catherine L.
    Jansson, Mats
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Benthic organic carbon release stimulates bacterioplankton production in a clear-water subarctic lake2013In: Freshwater Science, ISSN 2161-9549, E-ISSN 2161-9565, Vol. 32, no 1, p. 176-182Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    We carried out a set of experiments in a small clear-water lake in northern Sweden during summer 2010 to assess the effect of organic C (OC) released from epipelic algae on pelagic bacterial production (BP). The release rate of OC (dissolved and particulate) from epipelic algae was similar to 45.4 ng C m(-2) h(-1) Bacterioplankton uptake of dissolved OC was P-limited, and pelagic primary production (PP) was colimited by N and P. Pelagic BP (3.2 +/- 6 mu g C L-1 h(-1)) exceeded pelagic PP (0.012 +/- 0.008 mu g C L-1 h(-1)). Pelagic BP was higher in lake water in contact with sediments and the epipelic algae growing on their surface than in water separated from the sediments. Epipelic algae release OC to lake water and potentially stimulate pelagic BP. However, exploitation of benthic OC probably is suboptimal because of nutrient limitation (primarily by inorganic P) of BP.

  • 32. Sonesson, Mats
    et al.
    Sveinbjörnsson, Bjartmar
    Tehler, Anders
    Carlsson, Bengt Å.
    Uppsala universitet, Ekologisk botanik.
    A comparison of the physiology, anatomy and ribosomal DNA in alpine and subalpine populations of the lichen Nephroma arcticum – the effects of an eight-year transplant experiment2007In: The Bryologist, ISSN 0007-2745, E-ISSN 1938-4378, Vol. 110, no 2, p. 244-253Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Thalli of Nephroma arcticum were transplanted between and within a high-elevation alpine heath (1100 m) and a low-elevation subalpine mountain birch forest (380 m) in northern Swedish Lapland and harvested after eight years. Statistically significant differences (P < 0.05) were found between control samples for dark respiration rates, photon use efficiencies (apparent quantum yields) and light compensation points (all were higher in the high-altitude population). The following traits were significantly affected by transplanting: (1) epicortex thickness, (2) upper cortex thickness in the low-altitude population, (3) maximum photosynthetic rates, (4) dark respiration rates and (5) light compensation point. Of these malleable traits, all reduce the differences between the controls although there seems to be over-compensation in maximum net photosynthesis and under-compensation in dark respiration rate of the low-altitude population. Conservative traits, i.e., those that did not change significantly with transplantation were: (1) thallus thickness, (2) algal layer thickness, (3) algal cell diameter and (4) light saturation level. Small, yet significant differences in anatomy and physiology suggest that an ecotypic differentiation was established although the two internal transcribed DNA spacers ITS 1 and ITS 2 showed no corresponding variation between the populations.

  • 33.
    Thompson, Megan Shera
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Giesler, Reiner
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Karlsson, Jan
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Klaminder, Jonatan
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Size and characteristics of the DOC pool in near-surface subarctic mire permafrost as a potential source for nearby freshwaters2015In: Arctic, Antarctic and Alpine research, ISSN 1523-0430, E-ISSN 1938-4246, Vol. 47, no 1, p. 49-58Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Subarctic peatlands are rich sources of organic carbon for freshwater ecosystems. Where those peatlands are underlain by permafrost, permafrost thaw may cause an initial release of bioavailable dissolved organic carbon (DOC) to surrounding freshwaters. In this study, we measured icebound and potentially leachable (extracted) DOC quantities and indices of DOC quality in active layer and permafrost layers from two subarctic peat mires, Stord-alen and Storflaket. Most of the permafrost layers did not contain more organic matter or exportable DOC (as g kg(-1) dry soil) than the overlying active layer, and there was no difference in aromaticity, molecular weight, or the ratio between labile and recalcitrant DOC extracted from the permafrost and active layer. However, DOC held in segregated ice of the near-surface permafrost had relatively low aromaticity compared to extracted DOC from the same depth. Total icebound and potentially leachable DOC in the Stordalen mire permafrost that is predicted to experience active layer deepening during each of the next 50 years corresponded to about 0.1% of the current annual aquatic export of DOC from the mire. We conclude that the pool of potentially leachable DOC currently stored in permafrost layers is small. We also highlight differences in permafrost organic material between the two studied mire systems, which has an effect on the pool and properties of leachable DOC that is potentially available for export during thaw. Moreover, the geomorphological form of permafrost thaw will influence future hydrological connectedness and DOC production, in turn determining future DOC export from the mires.

  • 34. Truong, C.
    et al.
    Palmé, Anna
    Uppsala universitet, Evolutionär funktionsgenomik.
    Felber, F.
    Recent invasion of the mountain birch Betula pubescens ssp. tortuosa above the treeline due to climate change: genetic and ecological study in northern Sweden2007In: Journal of Evolutionary Biology, ISSN 1010-061X, E-ISSN 1420-9101, Vol. 20, no 1, p. 369-380Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Mountain birch, Betula pubescens ssp. tortuosa, forms the treeline in northern Sweden. A recent shift in the range of the species associated with an elevation of the treeline is commonly attributed to climate warming. Using microsatellite markers, we explored the genetic structure of populations along an altitudinal gradient close to the treeline. Low genetic differentiation was found between populations, whereas high genetic diversity was maintained within populations. High level of gene flow compensated for possible losses of genetic diversity at higher elevations and dissipated the founding effect of newly established populations above the treeline. Spatial autocorrelation analysis showed low spatial genetic structure within populations because of extensive gene flow. At the treeline, significant genetic structure within the juvenile age class at small distances did not persist in the adult age class, indicating recent expansion of young recruits due to the warming of the climate. Finally, seedling performance above the treeline was positively correlated with parameters related to temperature. These data confirm the high migration potential of the species in response to fluctuating environmental conditions and indicate that it is now invading higher altitudes due to the recent warming of the climate.

  • 35.
    van Zuijlen, Kristel
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Climate change effects on freezing damage in three subarctic bryophytes: A snow manipulation field experiment in a tundra ecosystem in Abisko, Sweden2015Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    Climate change is expected to have a large impact on northern ecosystems. Increased temperatures and altered precipitation and snow cover patterns will have a great impact on subarctic tundra. Bryophytes form an important component of tundra ecosystems because of their high abundance and their importance in many ecological processes. The effect of elevation and snow cover on freezing damage in shoots of three subarctic bryophytes: Ptilidium ciliare, Hylocomium splendens and Sphagnum fuscum, was studied in a snow manipulation field experiment at different elevations in Abisko, Sweden, during early spring. The treatments included snow addition, snow removal and control. In addition, bryophyte healthiness at the plot scale was determined by image analysis using colour selection, and soil temperature and moisture data were collected. Freezing damage differed significantly among bryophyte species with P. ciliare having the lowest freezing damage. There was a decrease in freezing damage over time due to the increase in temperature as spring progressed. Counter expectation, freezing damage was higher at low elevation although the mean daily minimum temperature was lower at higher elevation, which might be due to adaptation effects. Snow treatment had only a minor effect on freezing damage, but it did have an effect on proportion of undamaged tissue at the plot scale which increased with increasing snow cover at high elevation, but decreased with increasing snow cover at low elevation. Soil moisture content was also affected by snow treatment. The number of freeze-thaw cycles was less for S. fuscum and H. splendens compared to bare soil plots, which indicates insulating capacities of these bryophytes. Freezing damage could not be explained by the measured climate variables alone; therefore, it is likely the result of a complex set of factors, possibly including solar radiation and disturbance by herbivores.

  • 36.
    Vincent, Andrea G.
    et al.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Sundqvist, Maja K.
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Wardle, David A.
    Department of Forest Ecology and Management, Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences, Umeå, Sweden.
    Giesler, Reiner
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Bioavailable Soil Phosphorus Decreases with Increasing Elevation in a Subarctic Tundra Landscape2014In: PLoS ONE, ISSN 1932-6203, E-ISSN 1932-6203, Vol. 9, no 3, p. e92942-Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Phosphorus (P) is an important macronutrient in arctic and subarctic tundra and its bioavailability is regulated by the mineralization of organic P. Temperature is likely to be an important control on P bioavailability, although effects may differ across contrasting plant communities with different soil properties. We used an elevational gradient in northern Sweden that included both heath and meadow vegetation types at all elevations to study the effects of temperature, soil P sorption capacity and oxalate-extractable aluminium (Al-ox) and iron (Fe-ox) on the concentration of different soil P fractions. We hypothesized that the concentration of labile P fractions would decrease with increasing elevation (and thus declining temperature), but would be lower in meadow than in heath, given that N to P ratios in meadow foliage are higher. As expected, labile P in the form of Resin-P declined sharply with elevation for both vegetation types. Meadow soils did not have lower concentrations of Resin-P than heath soils, but they did have 2-fold and 1.5-fold higher concentrations of NaOH-extractable organic P and Residual P, respectively. Further, meadow soils had 3-fold higher concentrations of Al-ox + Feox and a 20% higher P sorption index than did heath soils. Additionally, Resin-P expressed as a proportion of total soil P for the meadow was on average half that in the heath. Declining Resin-P concentrations with elevation were best explained by an associated 2.5-3.0 degrees C decline in temperature. In contrast, the lower P availability in meadow relative to heath soils may be associated with impaired organic P mineralization, as indicated by a higher accumulation of organic P and P sorption capacity. Our results indicate that predicted temperature increases in the arctic over the next century may influence P availability and biogeochemistry, with consequences for key ecosystem processes limited by P, such as primary productivity.

  • 37.
    Watts, Jennifer Dawn
    University of Montana, Missoula, MT.
    Potential Contrasts in CO 2 and CH 4 Flux Response under Changing Climate Conditions: A Satellite Remote Sensing Driven Analysis of the Net Ecosystem Carbon Budget for Arctic and Boreal Regions2017Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
  • 38.
    Weston, David J.
    et al.
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Biosci Div, Oak Ridge, TN USA; Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Climate Change Sci Inst, Oak Ridge, TN USA.
    Turetsky, Merritt R.
    Univ Guelph, Dept Integrat Biol, Guelph, ON, Canada.
    Johnson, Matthew G.
    Texas Tech Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Lubbock, TX USA.
    Granath, Gustaf
    Uppsala universitet, Växtekologi och evolution.
    Lindo, Zoe
    Univ Western Ontario, Dept Biol, London, ON, Canada.
    Belyea, Lisa R.
    Queen Mary Univ London, Sch Geog, London, England.
    Rice, Steven K.
    Union Coll, Dept Biol Sci, Schenectady, NY USA.
    Hanson, David T.
    Univ New Mexico, Dept Biol, Albuquerque, NM USA.
    Engelhardt, Katharina A. M.
    Univ Maryland, Appalachian Lab, Ctr Environm Sci, Frostburg, MD USA.
    Schmutz, Jeremy
    HudsonAlpha Inst Biotechnol, Huntsville, AL USA; Joint Genome Inst, Dept Energy, Walnut Creek, CA USA.
    Dorrepaal, Ellen
    Ume Univ, Dept Ecol & Environm Sci, Climate Impacts Res Ctr, Abisko, Sweden.
    Euskirchen, Eugenie S.
    Univ Alaska, Inst Arctic Biol, Fairbanks, AK USA.
    Stenoien, Hans K.
    Norwegian Univ Sci & Technol, NTNU Univ Museum, Trondheim, Norway.
    Szovenyi, Peter
    Univ Zurich, Dept Systemat & Evolutionary Bot, Zurich, Switzerland.
    Jackson, Michelle
    Duke Univ, Dept Biol, Durham, NC USA.
    Piatkowski, Bryan T.
    Duke Univ, Dept Biol, Durham, NC USA.
    Muchero, Wellington
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Biosci Div, Oak Ridge, TN USA.
    Norby, Richard J.
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Climate Change Sci Inst, Oak Ridge, TN USA ;Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Environm Sci Div, Oak Ridge, TN USA.
    Kostka, Joel E.
    Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Biol, Atlanta, GA USA; Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Earth & Atmospher Sci, Atlanta, GA USA.
    Glass, Jennifer B.
    Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Biol, Atlanta, GA USA; Georgia Inst Technol, Sch Earth & Atmospher Sci, Atlanta, GA USA.
    Rydin, Håkan
    Uppsala universitet, Växtekologi och evolution.
    Limpens, Juul
    Wageningen Univ, Dept Environm Sci, Plant Ecol & Nat Conservat Grp, Wageningen, Netherlands.
    Tuittila, Eeva-Stiina
    Univ Eastern Finland, Sch Forest Sci, Peatland & Soil Ecol Grp, Joensuu, Finland.
    Ullrich, Kristian K.
    Max Planck Inst Evolutionary Biol, Plon, Germany.
    Carrell, Alyssa
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Biosci Div, Oak Ridge, TN USA.
    Benscoter, Brian W.
    Florida Atlantic Univ, Dept Biol Sci, Davie, FL USA.
    Chen, Jin-Gui
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Biosci Div, Oak Ridge, TN USA.
    Oke, Tobi A.
    Univ Guelph, Dept Integrat Biol, Guelph, ON, Canada.
    Nilsson, Mats B.
    Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Forest Ecol & Management, Umeå, Sweden.
    Ranjan, Priya
    Univ Tennessee, Dept Plant Sci, Knoxville, TN USA.
    Jacobson, Daniel
    Oak Ridge Natl Lab, Biosci Div, Oak Ridge, TN USA.
    Lilleskov, Erik A.
    US Forest Serv, Res Stn, Houghton, MI USA.
    Clymo, R. S.
    Queen Mary Univ London, Sch Biol & Chem Sci, London, England.
    Shaw, A. Jonathan
    Duke Univ, Dept Biol, Durham, NC USA.
    The Sphagnome Project: enabling ecological and evolutionary insights through a genus-level sequencing project2018In: New Phytologist, ISSN 0028-646X, E-ISSN 1469-8137, Vol. 217, no 1, p. 16-25Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Considerable progress has been made in ecological and evolutionary genetics with studies demonstrating how genes underlying plant and microbial traits can influence adaptation and even 'extend' to influence community structure and ecosystem level processes. Progress in this area is limited to model systems with deep genetic and genomic resources that often have negligible ecological impact or interest. Thus, important linkages between genetic adaptations and their consequences at organismal and ecological scales are often lacking. Here we introduce the Sphagnome Project, which incorporates genomics into a long-running history of Sphagnum research that has documented unparalleled contributions to peatland ecology, carbon sequestration, biogeochemistry, microbiome research, niche construction, and ecosystem engineering. The Sphagnome Project encompasses a genus-level sequencing effort that represents a new type of model system driven not only by genetic tractability, but by ecologically relevant questions and hypotheses.

  • 39.
    Wik, Martin
    et al.
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för geologiska vetenskaper.
    Crill, Patrick M.
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för geologiska vetenskaper.
    Varner, Ruth K.
    Bastviken, David
    Stockholms universitet, Institutionen för geologiska vetenskaper.
    Multiyear measurements of ebullitive methane flux from three subarctic lakes2013In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Biogeosciences, ISSN 2169-8953, E-ISSN 2169-8961, Vol. 118, no 3, p. 1307-1321Article in journal (Refereed)
    Abstract [en]

    Ebullition (bubbling) from small lakes and ponds at high latitudes is an important yet unconstrained source of atmospheric methane (CH4). Small water bodies are most abundant in permanently frozen peatlands, and it is speculated that their emissions will increase as the permafrost thaws. We made 6806 measurements of CH4 ebullition during four consecutive summers using a total of 40 bubble traps that were systematically distributed across the depth zones of three lakes in a sporadic permafrost landscape in northernmost Sweden. We identified significant spatial and temporal variations in ebullition and observed a large spread in the bubbles' CH4 concentration, ranging from 0.04% to 98.6%. Ebullition followed lake temperatures, and releases were significantly larger during periods with decreasing atmospheric pressure. Although shallow zone ebullition dominated the seasonal bubble CH4 flux, we found a shift in the depth dependency towards higher fluxes from intermediate and deep zones in early fall. The average daily flux of 13.4mg CH4 m(-2) was lower than those measured in most other high-latitude lakes. Locally, however, our study lakes are a substantial CH4 source; we estimate that 350kg of CH4 is released via ebullition during summer (June-September), which is approximately 40% of total whole year emissions from the nearby peatland. In order to capture the large variability and to accurately scale lake CH4 ebullition temporally and spatially, frequent measurements over long time periods are critical.

  • 40.
    Åberg, Jan
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Production and emission of CO2 in two unproductive lakes in northern Sweden2009Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Unproductive lakes are one of few natural landscape compartments with net release of carbon to the atmosphere. Lakes also generally decrease the net terrestrial carbon uptake, since most of the CO2 production in unproductive lakes are derived from organic carbon produced on land (e.g. in forests). High latitude lakes are predicted to be particularly affected by the global climate change. The carbon cycling in these lakes and their role in the landscape are therefore important to study.

    In this thesis, carbon turnover processes were studied in two lakes above the arctic circle (Lake Diktar-Erik and Lake Merasjärvi) in year 2004 and 2005. Both lakes were net heterotrophic, with large variations in CO2 concentrations both on shorter (30min) and longer (24h) time-scales. The pelagic habitat supported a major part of the net production of CO2, with larger dynamics in the CO2 production than the sediments. The CO2 variations of the surface water were related to respiration of allochthonous organic carbon, and were affected by the concentration and quality of the DOC, as well as the whole lake water temperatures, and vertical water movements.

    The emission of CO2 from Lake Merasjärvi was measured with the eddy covariance tech­nique. The results showed that the gas transfer rate during moderate winds were higher than expected, causing the two most commonly used models to underestimate the long term fluxes of CO2 from the lake.

    Taken together, the results of the thesis show that the studied lakes contributed to bring terrestrial organic carbon back into the atmosphere, driven by a substantial internal CO2 production based on mineralization of allochthonous organic carbon. Major results are that the eddy covariance technique indicated that commonly used models tend to underestimate the net release rate of CO2 from lakes to the atmosphere, and that the lake CO2 dynamics can be the results of interactions between biogeochemical and physical processes in the lake water.

  • 41.
    Ögren, Amanda
    Umeå universitet, Institutionen för ekologi, miljö och geovetenskap.
    Is above- and belowground phenology of Eriophorum vaginatum in sync in a peatland underlain by permafrost?2017Independent thesis Advanced level (degree of Master (Two Years)), 20 credits / 30 HE creditsStudent thesis
    Abstract [en]

    The phenology of plants in northern ecosystems is currently changing. Roots have a key role in these ecosystems, though the phenology of roots is still poorly understood. The aim of this report was to investigate if above- and belowground phenology of the circumpolar sedge Eriophorum vaginatum was synchronized in a subarctic peatland underlain by permafrost, and to investigate which abiotic factors are limiting root growth. Additionally, the length of the belowground growing season was examined. The study was performed with a non-destructive in situ method (minirhizotrons and NDVI measurements) in the northernmost part of Sweden. Both above- and belowground phenology was measured biweekly during the whole growing season in 2016. The depth of the active layer, air temperature, soil temperature and soil moisture were measured to investigate the determinants of root growth. Root growth and aboveground activity was asynchronous, as peak in root growth occurred on average 21 days before maximum NDVI was reached. Soil temperature and thaw depth seem to be important factors regulating root growth in this peatland. The result highlight that solely studying the aboveground parts of plants can give a misleading interpretation about the phenology of the entire plant and thus during which time periods important ecosystem processes take place. Hence, to more accurate forecast ecosystem responses to global warming, both aboveground and belowground phenology should be considered.

  • 42.
    Öhmark, Sara
    Mittuniversitetet, Avdelningen för naturvetenskap.
    Winter browsing by moose and hares in subarctic birch forest: Scale dependency and responses to food addition2015Doctoral thesis, comprehensive summary (Other academic)
    Abstract [en]

    Despite their difference in body size and morphology, the moose (Alces alces) andthe mountain hare (Lepus timidus) sustain themselves during winter on similar plantspecies and plant parts in in subarctic environments, namely apical twigs ofmountain birch (Betula pubescens ssp. czerepanovii). Herbivores must select areas anditems of food that provide sufficient intake rates and food nutritional quality whilebalancing this against their intake of dietary fiber and potentially detrimental plantsecondary metabolites. This selection takes place simultaneously at multiple spatialscales, from individual plants and plant parts to patches of food and parts of the wider landscape. While the herbivores must consider their need for food to sustaindaily activities, for body growth and reproduction it is also necessary to avoid predators and harsh environmental conditions. For managers, an understanding of key factors for animal foraging distributions is pivotal to reach intended goals ofmanagement and conservation plans. Knowledge in this area is also important formodels to make accurate predictions of foraging responses of herbivores to resource distributions. The mountain birch forest displays a naturally heterogeneous distribution of trees and shrubs which presents herbivores with a challenge to findgood feeding areas. In an investigation of the spatial distribution of moose browsing on birch and willows (Salix spp.) in two winter seasons separated in time by 14 years,it was found that moose browsing patterns in 1996 were correlated to those observed in 2010. It was also found that moose browsing was spatially clustered within the same distances (1000-2500 m) as densities of willow and birch, but at other spatial scales, browsing was mostly randomly distributed. It was concluded that foragedensity is a cue for moose but only at certain spatial scales. Similarly, a comparison of foraging distribution by hare and moose showed that high birch density was a key factor for both species. In spite of this, hares and moose used different parts ofthe same environment because they respond to food resource distribution at different spatial scales. Hares fed from smaller plants, and focused their foraging activity on smaller spatial scales than moose. These results emphasize the importance of taking into account the distribution of food resources at spatial scales relevant for each species in plans for conservation and management. In an experimental study it was found that intensified browsing on natural forage by mountain hares can be induced locally through placement of food. The induced browsing varied with the amount and quality of the added food, but also with thedensity of natural food plants and natural foraging distribution by hares. Finally, ina last experiment habitat preference of mountain hares across edges between open and forested areas was studied. The results were not consistent; hares utilized baitto a greater extent within forested areas than bait placed on a nearby lake ice, butbait on mires and heaths was either preferred over bait in nearby forest, or utilizedto a similar extent. A possible explanation is that hares have knowledge of their environment such that both forested areas and subarctic mires and heaths are partof its natural home range, whilst the extreme environment on the lake ice is not. During recent decades arctic areas have had an increase in vegetation density andwill be affected by future climate warming and therefore, factors that determineforaging ecology of key herbivores need to be identified. This thesis sheds some light on these factors in relation to spatial scale and forage distribution for two high profile herbivores in the subarctic.

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