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Nitrate and Sulfate Anthropogenic Trends in the 20th Century from Five Svalbard Ice Cores
Uppsala Univ, Dept Earth Sci, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
Uppsala Univ, Dept Earth Sci, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
Natl Inst Polar Res, Tachikawa, Tokyo 1908518, Japan..
Uppsala Univ, Dept Earth Sci, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden..
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2012 (English)In: Arctic, Antarctic and Alpine research, ISSN 1523-0430, E-ISSN 1938-4246, Vol. 44, no 4, 490-499 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Sulfate and nitrate records from 5 ice cores spread across Svalbard were compared and revealed strong temporal similarities with previously published global estimates of SO2 and NOx anthropogenic emissions during the 20th century. A significant departure from the early century sulfate and nitrate levels was evident at all drilling sites starting from the mid-1940s. A steady increase was observed in both sulfate and nitrate profiles at most sites until the late 1960s, when the annual concentrations started to increase at a higher rate. This peak activity lasted for about a decade, and was observed to decrease steadily from the early 1980s on, when sulfate levels declined significantly and when nitrate levels finally reached sulfate levels for the first time in 20th century. The timing of these trends in Svalbard with global SO2 and NOx concentration profiles was best appraised when considering composite concentration profiles of all Svalbard ice cores for sulfate and nitrate, respectively. Composite profiles were also found to provide a convenient mean for distinguishing between the most important world source regions. Based on correlation analysis, the major pollutant sources appeared to be Western Europe and North America for both sulfate and nitrate, followed by Central Europe and former U.S.S.R. in generally similar proportions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2012. Vol. 44, no 4, 490-499 p.
Research subject
SWEDARCTIC
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URN: urn:nbn:se:polar:diva-2411DOI: 10.1657/1938-4246-44.4.490ISI: 000311010700010OAI: oai:DiVA.org:polar-2411DiVA: diva2:883983
Available from: 2015-12-17 Created: 2015-10-07 Last updated: 2015-12-17

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