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Ice cores from Svalbard - useful archives of past climate and pollution history
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2003 (English)In: Physics and Chemistry of the Earth, ISSN 1474-7065, E-ISSN 1873-5193, Vol. 28, no 28-32, 1217-1228 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Ice cores from the relatively low-lying ice caps in Svalbard have not been widely exploited in climatic and environmental studies due to uncertainties about the effect of melt water percolation. However, results from two recent Svalbard ice cores, at Lomonosovfonna (1250 m asl) and Austfonna (750 m asl), have shown that with careful site selection, high-resolution sampling and multiple chemical analyses, it is possible to recover ice cores with partly preserved annual signals. These cores are estimated to cover at least the past 600 years and have been dated using a combination of known reference horizons and glacial modeling. The delta(18)O data from both Lomonosovfonna and Austfonna ice cores suggest that the 20th century was the warmest during the past 600 years. A comparison of the ice core and sea ice records from this period suggests that sea ice extent and Austfonna delta(18)O are linked over the past 400 years. This may reflect the position of the storm tracks and their direct influence on the relatively low altitude Austfonna. Lomonosovfonna may be less sensitive to such changes and primarily record atmospheric changes due to its higher elevation. The anthropogenic influence on Svalbard environment is illustrated by increased levels of non-sea-salt sulphate, nitrate, acidity, fly-ash and organic contaminants particularly during the second half of 1900s. Decreased concentrations of some components in recent decades most likely reflect emission and use restrictions. However, some current-use organic pesticide compounds show growing concentrations in near surface layers. (C) 2003 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
Norwegian Polar Res Inst, N-9296 Tromso, Norway. Univ Penn, Philadelphia, PA 19104 USA. Univ Oulu, Inst Geosci, FIN-90014 Oulu, Finland. Natl Inst Polar Res, Tokyo 1738515, Japan. Univ Lapland, Arct Ctr, FIN-96101 Rovaniemi, Finland. Environm Canada, Burlington, ON L7R 4A6, Canada. Uppsala Univ, Dept Earth Sci, S-75236 Uppsala, Sweden. Tallinn Univ Technol, Inst Geol, EE-10743 Tallinn, Estonia. Inst Marine & Atmospher Res Utrecht, NL-3508 TA Utrecht, Netherlands., 2003. Vol. 28, no 28-32, 1217-1228 p.
Keyword [en]
ice core chemistry, climate variability, organic contaminants, pollen, Svalbard
Research subject
SWEDARCTIC
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:polar:diva-2435DOI: 10.1016/j.pce.2003.08.053ISI: 000186764900007OAI: oai:DiVA.org:polar-2435DiVA: diva2:883544
Conference
6th International Scientific Seminar on Changing Physical Environment, OCT 08-10, 2002, TROMSO, NORWAY
Available from: 2015-12-17 Created: 2015-10-07 Last updated: 2015-12-17

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