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CO2-system development in young sea ice and CO2 gas exchange at the ice/air interface mediated by brine and frost flowers in Kongsfjorden, Spitsbergen
Norwegian Polar Res Inst, Fram Ctr, Tromso, Norway.;Univ Gothenburg, Dept Earth Sci, Gothenburg, Sweden..
Univ Gothenburg, Dept Chem & Mol Biol, Gothenburg, Sweden.;Inst Marine Res, Tromso, Norway..
Univ Gothenburg, Dept Chem & Mol Biol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
Univ Gothenburg, Dept Chem & Mol Biol, Gothenburg, Sweden..
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2015 (English)In: Annals of Glaciology, ISSN 0260-3055, E-ISSN 1727-5644, Vol. 56, no 69, 245-257 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
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Abstract [en]

In March and April 2010, we investigated the development of young landfast sea ice in Kongsfjorden, Spitsbergen, Svalbard. We sampled the vertical column, including sea ice, brine, frost flowers and sea water, to determine the CO2 system, nutrients, salinity and bacterial and ice algae production during a 13 day interval of ice growth. Apart from the changes due to salinity and brine rejection, the sea-ice concentrations of total inorganic carbon (C-T), total alkalinity (A(T)), CO2 and carbonate ions (CO32-) in melted ice were influenced by dissolution of calcium carbonate (CaCO3) precipitates (25-55 mu mol kg(-1)) and played the largest role in the changes to the CO2 system. The C-T values were also influenced by CO2 gas flux, bacterial carbon production and primary production, which had a small impact on the C-T. The only exception was the uppermost ice layer. In the top 0.05 m of the ice, there was a CO2 loss of similar to 20 mu mol kg(-1) melted ice (1 mmol m(-2)) from the ice to the atmosphere. Frost flowers on newly formed sea ice were important in promoting ice-air CO2 gas flux, causing a CO2 loss to the atmosphere of 140-800 mu mol kg(-1) d(-1) melted frost flowers (7-40 mmol m(-2)d(-1)).

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 56, no 69, 245-257 p.
Keyword [en]
atmosphere/ice/ocean interactions, ice chemistry, polar and subpolar oceans, sea-ice dynamics
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:polar:diva-2521DOI: 10.3189/2015AoG69A563ISI: 000363083200004OAI: oai:DiVA.org:polar-2521DiVA: diva2:880428
Available from: 2015-12-09 Created: 2015-12-09 Last updated: 2015-12-09

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