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The Cambrian lophotrochozoans of the Transantarctic Mountains, Antarctica
Responsible organisation
2015 (English)Other (Other academic)
Abstract [en]

The origin of many lophotrochozoan groups can be traced to “small shelly fossil” (SSF) faunas of the Early Cambrian. Antarctica is a key region of study, due to the continent’s known close geographical proximity to well-studied Australian and Indian basins in in the Cambrian. Few studies have focused on this region however, due to a paucity of data. Re-examination of camenellan sclerites from the Early Cambrian Shackleton Limestone of the Churchill Mountains of Antarctica has revealed a previously unidentified species of Dailyatia in the formation, co-occurring alongside previously described Dailyatia odyssei Evans and Rowell, 1990, as in the Arrowie Basin of Australia. Re-examination of material previously described asKennardia sp. A and Kennardia sp. B has indicated that these taxa can likely be synonymized as a second species of DailyatiaDailyatia sclerites were also found in the temporally equivalent “Schneider Hills Limestone” formation, which cropsout in the Argentina Range of Antarctica. These specimens appear to belongto a third species of Dailyatia, suggesting that the spatial distribution of tommotiids in the Early Cambrian was more complex than previously recognized, and that the group may be useful in future biostratigraphic studies. A study ofthe Middle Cambrian (Drumian Stage) Nelson Limestone Formation of the Neptune Range, Antarctica has revealed a moderately diverse brachiopod and trilobite fauna. The brachiopods have strong faunal links to taxa from South Australia and India, as well as other parts of the Antarctic province, fitting independent strong evidence for a united East Gondwanan region in the Middle Cambrian. An unidentified camenellan tommotiid sclerite is also described from the Nelson Limestone. This extends the worldwide temporal range of the tommotiid clade into the Drumian Stage, and suggests that more basal members of the brachiopod stem-group survived to form part of a more diverse Middle Cambrian fauna.

Place, publisher, year, pages
Uppsala: Uppsala universitet , 2015.
Keyword [en]
Brachiopoda, Dailyatia, Cambrian, Drumian, Middle Cambrian, Early Cambrian, Antarctica, tommotiid, camenellan, palaeobiology, small shelly fossils
Research subject
SWEDARP 2011/12, Victoria Land
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:polar:diva-2247OAI: oai:DiVA.org:polar-2247DiVA: diva2:856442
Available from: 2015-09-24 Created: 2015-09-24 Last updated: 2015-09-24

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CiteExportLink to record
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  • apa
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