Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Behavioural response of moose Alces alces and brown bears Ursus arctos to direct helicopter approach by researchers
Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Dept Ecol & Nat Resource Management, NO-1432 As, Norway.;Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, SE-90183 Umea, Sweden..
Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, SE-90183 Umea, Sweden..
Swedish Univ Agr Sci, Dept Wildlife Fish & Environm Studies, SE-90183 Umea, Sweden..
Norwegian Univ Life Sci, Dept Ecol & Nat Resource Management, NO-1432 As, Norway.;Norwegian Inst Nat Res, NO-7485 Trondheim, Norway..
Show others and affiliations
Responsible organisation
2010 (English)In: Wildlife Biology, ISSN 0909-6396, Vol. 16, no 3, 292-300 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Helicopters are used for numerous wildlife management and research purposes, but can alter wildlife behaviour and influence baseline data collection. We investigated reactions of GPS-collared moose Alces alces and brown bears Ursus arctos to short-term helicopter approaches by researchers. Moose responded with up to 10 times greater movement rates for up to two hours following a helicopter approach and moved into more rugged terrain. Brown bears decreased their speed and remained within similar habitat types and terrain. The movements were influenced only about two hours and did not influence the size of the activity areas. Contrary to our predictions, brown bears responded with a somewhat calmer response than moose, illustrating response differences in large herbivores and carnivores. This difference in response might be because brown bears are actually less disturbed than moose by direct helicopter approaches or because of a difference in tactical behaviour between brown bears and moose following disturbance. Researchers and managers should thus be cautious in using knowledge from one species to predict or perceive disturbance response in another species or taxa.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 16, no 3, 292-300 p.
Keyword [en]
aircraft, Alces alces, brown bears, disturbance, GPS, moose, overflight, Sweden, Ursus arctos
Research subject
SWEDARCTIC 2008, Arktiska Sverige
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:polar:diva-2208DOI: 10.2981/09-041ISI: 000283702100008OAI: oai:DiVA.org:polar-2208DiVA: diva2:856034
Available from: 2015-09-23 Created: 2015-09-23 Last updated: 2015-09-23

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text
In the same journal
Wildlife Biology

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

Altmetric score

Total: 8 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf