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Bone-eating worms from the Antarctic: the contrasting fate of whale and wood remains on the Southern Ocean seafloor
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2013 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 280, 20131390Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We report the results from the first experimental study of the fate of whale and wood remains on the Antarctic seafloor. Using a baited free-vehicle lander design, we show that whale-falls in the Antarctic are heavily infested by at least two new species of bone-eating worm, Osedax antarcticus sp. nov. and Osedax deceptionensis sp. nov. In stark contrast, wood remains are remarkably well preserved with the absence of typical wood-eating fauna such as the xylophagainid bivalves. The combined whale-fall and wood-fall experiment provides support to the hypothesis that the Antarctic circumpolar current is a barrier to the larvae of deep-water species that are broadly distributed in other ocean basins. Since humans first started exploring the Antarctic, wood has been deposited on the seafloor in the form of shipwrecks and waste; our data suggest that this anthropogenic wood may be exceptionally well preserved. Alongside the new species descriptions, we conducted a comprehensive phylogenetic analyses of Osedax, suggesting the clade is most closely related to the frenulate tubeworms, not the vestimentiferans as previous reported.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2013. Vol. 280, 20131390
Keyword [en]
whale-fall wood-fall Annelida Polychaeta Siboglinidae Xylophaga deep-sea boring bivalves north-atlantic circumpolar current osedax boneworms global climate drake passage falls siboglinidae sediments Life Sciences & Biomedicine - Other Topics Environmental Sciences & Ecology Evolutionary Biology
Research subject
SWEDARP 2007/08, Oden Southern Ocean 2007/08
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:polar:diva-1901DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2013.1390OAI: oai:DiVA.org:polar-1901DiVA: diva2:810433
Note

ISI Document Delivery No.: 298JY Times Cited: 5 Cited Reference Count: 43 Glover, Adrian G. Wiklund, Helena Taboada, Sergio Avila, Conxita Cristobo, Javier Smith, Craig R. Kemp, Kirsty M. Jamieson, Alan J. Dahlgren, Thomas G. Cristobo, Javier/M-1949-2014 Cristobo, Javier/0000-0002-7725-4055 Ymer 80; Swedish Research Council; Swedish Polar Research Secretariat; US NSF Office of Polar Programmes; Spanish Government [CGL2007-65453/ANT, ACTIQUIMWHALES CTM2008-03135-E/ANT]; Banco Popular Ymer 80, the Swedish Research Council, the Swedish Polar Research Secretariat, US NSF Office of Polar Programmes, Spanish Government (ACTIQUIM projects CGL2007-65453/ANT and ACTIQUIMWHALES CTM2008-03135-E/ANT) and Banco Popular funded this research. 5 Royal soc London Biology; Ecology; Evolutionary Biology

Available from: 2015-05-07 Created: 2015-05-06 Last updated: 2015-05-26Bibliographically approved

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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
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