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Trophic position and foraging ecology of Ross, Weddell, and crabeater seals revealed by compound-specific isotope analysis
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Number of Authors: 12
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2019 (English)In: Marine Ecology Progress Series, Vol. 611, p. 1-18Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

ABSTRACT: Ross seals Ommatophoca rossii are one of the least studied marine mammals, with little known about their foraging ecology. Research to date using bulk stable isotope analysis suggests that Ross seals have a trophic position intermediate between that of Weddell Leptonychotes weddellii and crabeater Lobodon carcinophaga seals. However, consumer bulk stable isotope values not only reflect trophic dynamics, but also variations in baseline isotope values, which can be substantial. We used compound-specific isotope analysis of amino acids (CSI-AA) to separate isotopic effects of a shifting baseline versus trophic structure on the foraging ecology of these ecologically important Antarctic pinnipeds. We found that Ross seals forage in an open ocean food web, while crabeater and Weddell seals forage within similar food webs closer to shore. However, isotopic evidence suggests that crabeater seals are likely following sea ice, while Weddell seals target productive areas of the continental shelf of West Antarctica. Our CSI-AA data indicate that Ross seals have a high trophic position equivalent to that of Weddell seals, contrary to prior conclusions from nitrogen isotope results on bulk tissues. CSI-AA indicates that crabeater seals are at a trophic position lower than that of Ross and Weddell seals, consistent with a krill-dominated diet. Our results redefine the view of the trophic dynamics and foraging ecology of the Ross seal, and also highlight the importance of quantifying baseline isotope variations in foraging studies.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2019. Vol. 611, p. 1-18
Keywords [en]
Ross seal, Weddell seal, Crabeater seal, Compound-specific isotopes, Amino acids, Antarctica, Foraging ecology, Trophic dynamics
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
SWEDARP 2008/09, Oden Southern Ocean 2008/09; SWEDARP 2010/11, Oden Southern Ocean 2010/11
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:polar:diva-8305DOI: 10.3354/meps12856OAI: oai:DiVA.org:polar-8305DiVA, id: diva2:1384662
Available from: 2020-01-10 Created: 2020-01-10 Last updated: 2020-01-10

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Publisher's full texthttps://www.int-res.com/abstracts/meps/v611/p1-18/
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CiteExportLink to record
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Citation style
  • apa
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
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  • nn-NO
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