Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Phylogenetic relationships between geographically separate Phormidium cyanobacteria: is there a link between north and south polar regions?
Responsible organisation
2010 (English)In: Polar Biology, ISSN 0722-4060, E-ISSN 1432-2056, Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1419-1428Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

We present a phytogeographical comparison between polar (Arctic and Antarctic) and non-polar strains of the cyanobacterial genus Phormidium, which plays a key role in Arctic and Antarctic ecosystems as primary producer. A total of 26 Phormidium strains were studied using a polyphasic approach, 18 from Arctic (Svalbard, Ellesmere Island and Scandinavian Arctic—Abisko) and Antarctic (Antarctic Peninsula—King George and James Ross Island) regions, and 8 from temperate sites (mostly situated in Central Europe). A phylogenetic tree was constructed and compared with similar 16S rRNA sequences retrieved from Genbank. Within the Phormidium autumnale cluster, genetic similarity of 16S rDNA was more related to geographical proximity of strain origin than to morphological similarity. No genetic identity of Phormidium strains from north and south polar regions was found. The cluster Phormidium autumnale apparently belongs to generic entities in which geographical limitation plays a prominent role. However, the cyanobacterial strains found in Europe suggest that the distribution areas of some Phormidium cyanobacteria overlap. The Phormidium autumnale cluster is evidently a very characteristic type and represents an isolated clade within the traditional genus Phormidium. According to morphological features and the structure of trichomes, it is most similar and thus probably belongs to the genus Microcoleus.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2010. Vol. 33, no 10, p. 1419-1428
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:polar:diva-8186DOI: 10.1007/s00300-010-0834-8OAI: oai:DiVA.org:polar-8186DiVA, id: diva2:1289943
Available from: 2019-02-19 Created: 2019-02-19 Last updated: 2019-02-19

Open Access in DiVA

No full text in DiVA

Other links

Publisher's full texthttps://doi.org/10.1007/s00300-010-0834-8
In the same journal
Polar Biology
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf