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Nitrogen Uptake During One Year in Subarctic Plant Functional Groups and in Microbes After Long-Term Warming and Fertilization
Responsible organisation
2008 (English)In: Ecosystems (New York. Print), ISSN 1432-9840, E-ISSN 1435-0629, Vol. 11, no 8, p. 1223-1233Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

For the first time in an arctic long-term warming and fertilization experiment, the short-term (days) and longer-term (month and year) nitrogen (N) uptake and allocation in plants, microbes, and soil pools were studied, with 15N-labeling of an organic nitrogen form, glycine. The long-term warming and fertilization had no marked effect on soil inorganic N content, but both dissolved organic N (DON) and plant biomass did increase after fertilization. Soil microbes initially immobilized most of the added 15N, but in the following months, they lost two-thirds, while label concentration in plants increased. After a year, however, the 15N recovered in microbes was still 10-fold higher than that in the plant biomass, showing the high importance of soil microbes in nutrient retention in arctic ecosystems, irrespective of the impact of long-term warming or fertilization. The effects of the treatments on the uptake of label by deciduous shrubs and evergreens paralleled that of their N pool sizes, suggesting that their N uptake potential was unaffected by long-term warming and fertilizer addition. Mosses and herbs had high uptake potential but in fertilized plots they took up less 15N, that is, they were N saturated. The fraction of 15N in microbes tended to decrease after fertilization, but this was an effect of higher N pool dilution after 1 month and a year, and not due to lower initial uptake. Although the concentration of soil inorganic N did not change after fertilization, both increased DON and the results of the 15N label addition showed that the N availability in the ecosystem had increased. By contrast, warming had little effect on soil N pools and microbial 15N uptake, and, hence, had no detectable effects on 15N accumulation.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2008. Vol. 11, no 8, p. 1223-1233
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:polar:diva-8050DOI: 10.1007/s10021-008-9204-6OAI: oai:DiVA.org:polar-8050DiVA, id: diva2:1286289
Available from: 2019-02-06 Created: 2019-02-06 Last updated: 2019-02-06Bibliographically approved

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  • apa
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