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Application of near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) to assess some properties of a sub-arctic ecosystem
Responsible organisation
2006 (English)In: Basic and Applied Ecology, ISSN 1439-1791, E-ISSN 1618-0089, Vol. 7, no 2, 167-187 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Investigations of temporal and spatial variation of chemical properties of ecosystem components on a landscape level are hampered by the need to analyze large numbers of samples. Near infrared reflectance spectroscopy (NIRS) might provide a useful tool. to overcome this problem. Here we investigated the possibilities and Limitations to quantify the chemical composition of different plant parts and ecological. properties with the help of NIRS. For this, we addressed the following questions: (1) Can NIRS-models be used to quantify different primary compounds (nitrogen, fibre), groups of secondary compounds (condensed tannins, total phenotics) as well as specific phenolic components (e.g., salicin) in leaves, twigs and titter of Salix phylicifolia? (2) Can NIRS be used to predict ecological. properties such as moose browsing on willow or the decomposition rate of Leaf titter? NIRS predicted the different primary compounds and grouped secondary compounds in different plant material with high accuracy. Results were inconsistent for specific phenolics. For ecological, properties (moose browsing, titter decomposition rate) NIRS-models had high coefficients of determination. But tests of the models with a second independent set of samples (independent-data-set-test: IDS-test) showed that the predicted values were too tow even though they were ranked correctly. Based on these results, the application of a second independent test is recommended. In the present study this second validation indicated inconsistencies in the NIRS-models that had not been revealed by the conventional validation procedures used to develop the models (test-set and cross-validation). According to the present results NIRS represents a suitable and cost-effective tool. to measure primary and groups of secondary components of plant material. Application to specific phenolic compounds requires more elaborate testing. The successful reconstruction of moose browsing and the prediction of litter decomposition rate show that NIRS offers new possibilities for ecological applications. (c) 2005 Gesellschaft fur Okologie. Published by Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
ELSEVIER GMBH, URBAN & FISCHER VERLAG , 2006. Vol. 7, no 2, 167-187 p.
Keyword [en]
animal-plant interactions; plant chemistry; Salix phylicifolia; willows; browsing; decomposition; nitrogen; fibre; phenolics; Alces alces; landscape level
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:polar:diva-3700DOI: 10.1016/j.baae.2005.05.002OAI: oai:DiVA.org:polar-3700DiVA: diva2:1104628
Available from: 2017-06-01 Created: 2017-06-01 Last updated: 2017-06-01

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