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Growing-season carbon dioxide flux in a dry subarctic heath: Responses to long-term manipulations
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2004 (English)In: Arctic, Antarctic and Alpine research, ISSN 1523-0430, E-ISSN 1938-4246, Vol. 36, no 4, 456-463 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Carbon dioxide fluxes in a dry subarctic heath were examined after 10 and 11 yr of experimental manipulations of temperature, light, and nutrients. The aim was to investigate how growing season carbon (C) balance was affected by the major climatic factors that are expected to change in the future. Carbon flux was measured in closed chambers as uptake through gross ecosystem production (GP), release through ecosystem respiration (ER), and as net ecosystem production (NEP). Diurnal NEP through a day with clear skies at peak growing season was consistently negative through all treatments the first year of measurement, and day-time NEP varied around zero at eight days across the growing season the second year, implying that a net release of C from the ecosystem to the atmosphere may take place during the growing season. Our results suggest that respiration was the main determinant of C balance, and that variations in light levels and temperature could alter the balance between C uptake and C loss. Fertilization strongly enhanced both ER and GP whereas temperature enhancement changed neither ER nor GP. Shading decreased both ER and GP. After harvest of the aboveground plant biomass, the belowground respiration was 72 to 93% of the ER before harvest. The significant treatment effects on belowground respiration after harvest were similar to the effects on ER before harvest. These results suggest that the ER were mainly from belowground respiration, and that the treatments affected the belowground respiration more than the respiration above ground.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
INST ARCTIC ALPINE RES , 2004. Vol. 36, no 4, 456-463 p.
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Natural Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:polar:diva-3628DOI: 10.1657/1523-0430(2004)036[0456:GCDFIA]2.0.CO;2OAI: oai:DiVA.org:polar-3628DiVA: diva2:1103024
Available from: 2017-05-30 Created: 2017-05-30 Last updated: 2017-05-30

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