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Uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide in Arctic shelf seas: evaluation of the relative importance of processes that influence pCO(2) in water transported over the Bering-Chukchi Sea shelf
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2005 (English)In: Marine Chemistry, ISSN 0304-4203, E-ISSN 1872-7581, Vol. 94, no 1-4, 67-79 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The uptake of atmospheric carbon dioxide in the water transported over the Bering-Chukchi shelves has been assessed from the change in carbon-related chemical constituents. The calculated uptake of atmospheric CO2 from the time that the water enters the Bering Sea shelf until it reaches the northern Chukchi Sea shelf slope (similar to 1 year) was estimated to be 86 +/- 22 g C m(-2) in the upper 100 m. Combining the average uptake per m(3) with a volume flow of 0.83 x 10(6) m(3) s(-1) through the Bering Strait yields a flux of 22x10(12) g C year(-1). We have also estimated the relative contribution from cooling, biology, freshening, CaCO3 dissolution, and denitrification for the modification of the seawater PCO2 over the shelf The latter three had negligible impact on PCO2 compared to biology and cooling. Biology was found to be almost twice as important as cooling for lowering the pCO(2) in the water on the Bering-Chukchi shelves. Those results were compared with earlier surveys made in the Barents Sea, where the uptake of atmospheric CO2 was about half that estimated in the Bering-Chukchi Seas. Cooling and biology were of nearly equal significance in the Barents Sea in driving the flux Of CO2 into the ocean. The differences between the two regions are discussed. The loss of inorganic carbon due to primary production was estimated from the change in phosphate concentration in the water column. A larger loss of nitrate relative to phosphate compared to the classical Delta N/Delta P ratio of 16 was found. This excess loss was about 30% of the initial nitrate concentration and could possibly be explained by denitrification in the sediment of the Bering and Chukchi Seas. (c) 2004 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2005. Vol. 94, no 1-4, 67-79 p.
Keyword [en]
carbon dioxide; air-sea exchange; pCO(2); denitrification; Bering Sea; Chukchi Sea
National Category
Natural Sciences
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:polar:diva-3290DOI: 10.1016/j.marchem.2004.07.010OAI: oai:DiVA.org:polar-3290DiVA: diva2:1052816
Available from: 2016-12-07 Created: 2016-12-07 Last updated: 2016-12-07

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  • apa
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