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Effects of synoptic patterns on atmospheric chemistry and aerosols during the Arctic Ocean Expedition 1996
Responsible organisation
2001 (English)In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Atmospheres, ISSN 2169-897X, E-ISSN 2169-8996, Vol. 106, no D23, 32069-32086 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

The atmospheric program on the Arctic Ocean Expedition of July through September 1996 (AOE-96) was focused on aerosol climate feedback. The expedition took place close to the saddle point between a semipersistent anticyclonic ridge from near Scandinavia to the Arctic coast of eastern Siberia and a trough from the Canadian archipelago across the pole to north central Siberia. The weather varied from anticyclonic clear-sky conditions to cyclonic cloudy conditions, and 13 identifiable migratory features (frontal bands, wave disturbances) clearly influenced local weather, clouds, atmospheric transport, and chemistry. This includes an explosive polar cyclone, born at the lateral heat gradient between Greenland and the pack ice rather than between open sea and the pack ice. The synoptic scale weather systems caused the strongest variability in trace gases (O-3 in particular) and aerosols, and also strong variability in the cloud cover. The formation of air masses over the pack ice primarily depends on if there is cyclonic (convergent) or anticyclonic (divergent) flow. Cyclonic flow resulted in a modified marine air mass loaded with vapor, but with low aerosol number concentrations owing to frequent clouds and fogs and efficient cloud scavenging of the aerosol. Anticyclonic flow resulted in almost continental air masses with clear sky, long residence time over the pack ice and subsidence slowly replacing the boundary layer with free tropospheric air, low vapor concentrations, but large aerosol number in lack of efficient cloud scavenging. The synoptic variability and advection from south of the ice edge were weaker than during the predecessor International Arctic Ocean Expedition in 1991 (IAOE-91), when on average the sampled air spent 55 hours over the pack ice compared to more than 120 hours during AOE-96, owing to exceptionally high cyclone activity in 1991. This caused a large difference in atmospheric transport, chemistry, and aerosols between the two expeditions.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2001. Vol. 106, no D23, 32069-32086 p.
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
SWEDARCTIC 1996, Arctic Ocean 1996
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:polar:diva-3243DOI: 10.1029/2000JD900376OAI: oai:DiVA.org:polar-3243DiVA: diva2:1049825
Available from: 2016-11-25 Created: 2016-11-21 Last updated: 2016-11-25

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
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  • Other locale
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Output format
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