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Long-term acclimation to elevated pCO(2) alters carbon metabolism and reduces growth in the Antarctic diatom Nitzschia lecointei
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2015 (English)In: Proceedings of the Royal Society of London. Biological Sciences, ISSN 0962-8452, E-ISSN 1471-2954, Vol. 282, no 1815Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Increasing atmospheric CO2 levels are driving changes in the seawater carbonate system, resulting in higher pCO(2) and reduced pH (ocean acidification). Many studies on marine organisms have focused on short-term physiological responses to increased pCO(2), and few on slow-growing polar organisms with a relative low adaptation potential. In order to recognize the consequences of climate change in biological systems, acclimation and adaptation to new environments are crucial to address. In this study, physiological responses to long-term acclimation (194 days, approx. 60 asexual generations) of three pCO(2) levels (280, 390 and 960 mu atm) were investigated in the psychrophilic sea ice diatom Nitzschia lecointei. After 147 days, a small reduction in growth was detected at 960 mu atm pCO(2). Previous short-term experiments have failed to detect altered growth in N. lecointei at high pCO(2), which illustrates the importance of experimental duration in studies of climate change. In addition, carbon metabolism was significantly affected by the long-term treatments, resulting in higher cellular release of dissolved organic carbon (DOC). In turn, the release of labile organic carbon stimulated bacterial productivity in this system. We conclude that long-term acclimation to ocean acidification is important for N. lecointei and that carbon overconsumption and DOC exudation may increase in a high-CO2 world.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2015. Vol. 282, no 1815
Keyword [en]
climate change; polar; algae; primary production; bacterial production; Southern Ocean
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Natural Sciences
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URN: urn:nbn:se:polar:diva-2924DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2015.1513OAI: oai:DiVA.org:polar-2924DiVA: diva2:1046089
Available from: 2016-11-11 Created: 2016-10-27 Last updated: 2016-11-11

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CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

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Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf