Change search
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf
Increasing carbon inventory of the intermediate layers of the Arctic Ocean
Show others and affiliations
Responsible organisation
2014 (English)In: Journal of Geophysical Research - Oceans, ISSN 2169-9275, E-ISSN 2169-9291, Vol. 119, no 4, 2312-2326 p.Article in journal (Refereed) Published
Abstract [en]

Key Points <list id=”jgrc20638-list-0001” list-type=”bulleted”> <list-item id=”jgrc20638-li-0001”>Inorganic carbon concentration increase in intermediate water layers of the Arctic Ocean <list-item id=”jgrc20638-li-0002”>No significant trend in nutrient or oxygen concentrations was found <list-item id=”jgrc20638-li-0003”>Inflow of anthropogenic carbon to intermediate layers is the likely cause Abstract Concentrations of dissolved inorganic carbon (DIC), total alkalinity (TA), nutrients, and oxygen in subsurface waters of the central Arctic Ocean have been investigated for conceivable time trends over the last two decades. Data from six cruises (1991-2011) that cover the Nansen, Amundsen, and Makarov Basins were included in this analysis. In waters deeper than 2000 m, no statistically significant trend could be observed for DIC, TA, phosphate, or nitrate, but a small rate of increase in apparent oxygen utilization (AOU) was noticeable. For the individual stations, differences in concentration of each property were computed between the mean concentrations in the Arctic Atlantic Water (AAW) or the upper Polar Deep Water (uPDW), i.e., between about 150 and 1400 m depth, and in the deep water (assumed invariable over time). In these shallower water layers, we observe significant above-zero time trends for DIC, in the range of 0.6-0.9 mol kg(-1) yr(-1) (for AAW) and 0.4-0.6 mu mol kg(-1) yr(-1) (for uPDW). No time trend in nutrients could be observed, indicating no change in the rate of organic matter mineralization within this depth range. Consequently, the buildup of DIC is attributed to increasing concentrations of anthropogenic carbon in the waters flowing into these depth layers of the Arctic Ocean. The resulting rate of increase of the column inventory of anthropogenic CO2 is estimated to be between 0.6 and 0.9 mol C m(-2) yr(-1), with distinct differences between basins.

Place, publisher, year, edition, pages
2014. Vol. 119, no 4, 2312-2326 p.
Keyword [en]
Arctic Ocean; anthropogenic carbon
National Category
Natural Sciences
Research subject
SWEDARCTIC 2005, Beringia 2005; SWEDARCTIC 1991, Arctic Ocean 1991
Identifiers
URN: urn:nbn:se:polar:diva-2952DOI: 10.1002/2013JC009514OAI: oai:DiVA.org:polar-2952DiVA: diva2:1045093
Available from: 2016-11-08 Created: 2016-10-27 Last updated: 2016-11-08

Open Access in DiVA

No full text

Other links

Publisher's full text
In the same journal
Journal of Geophysical Research - Oceans
Natural Sciences

Search outside of DiVA

GoogleGoogle Scholar

doi
urn-nbn

Altmetric score

doi
urn-nbn
Total: 6 hits
CiteExportLink to record
Permanent link

Direct link
Cite
Citation style
  • apa
  • harvard1
  • ieee
  • modern-language-association-8th-edition
  • vancouver
  • Other style
More styles
Language
  • de-DE
  • en-GB
  • en-US
  • fi-FI
  • nn-NO
  • nn-NB
  • sv-SE
  • Other locale
More languages
Output format
  • html
  • text
  • asciidoc
  • rtf