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Synergistic effects of insect herbivory and changing climate on plant volatile emissions in the subarctic tundra
Ansvarlig organisasjon
2021 (engelsk)Inngår i: Global Change Biology, ISSN 1354-1013, E-ISSN 1365-2486, Vol. n/a, nr n/aArtikkel i tidsskrift (Fagfellevurdert) Published
Abstract [en]

Climate change increases the insect abundance, especially in Arctic ecosystems. Insect herbivory also significantly increases plant emissions of volatile organic compounds (VOCs), which are highly reactive in the atmosphere and play a crucial role in atmospheric chemistry and physics. However, it is unclear how the effects of insect herbivory on VOC emissions interact with climatic changes, such as warming and increased cloudiness. We assessed how experimental manipulations of temperature and light availability in subarctic tundra, that had been maintained for 30 years at the time of the measurements, affect the VOC emissions from a widespread dwarf birch (Betula nana) when subjected to herbivory by local geometrid moth larvae, the autumnal moth (Epirrita autumnata) and the winter moth (Operophtera brumata). Warming and insect herbivory on B. nana stimulated VOC emission rates and altered the VOC blend. The herbivory-induced increase in sesquiterpene and homoterpene emissions were climate-treatment-dependent. Many herbivory-associated VOCs were more strongly induced in the shading treatment than in other treatments. We showed generally enhanced tundra VOC emissions upon insect herbivory and synergistic effects on the emissions of some VOC groups in a changing climate, which can have positive feedbacks on cloud formation. Furthermore, the acclimation of plants to long-term climate treatments affects VOC emissions and strongly interacts with plant responses to herbivory. Such acclimation complicates predictions of how climate change, together with interacting biotic stresses, affects VOC emissions in the high latitudes.

sted, utgiver, år, opplag, sider
John Wiley & Sons, Ltd , 2021. Vol. n/a, nr n/a
Emneord [en]
biotic stress, climate change, dwarf birch, ecosystem–atmosphere interactions, geometrid moth, insect herbivory, subarctic, volatile organic compounds
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Identifikatorer
URN: urn:nbn:se:polar:diva-8729DOI: 10.1111/gcb.15773OAI: oai:DiVA.org:polar-8729DiVA, id: diva2:1581324
Tilgjengelig fra: 2021-07-20 Laget: 2021-07-20 Sist oppdatert: 2021-07-20

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